amenorrhea

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dunno

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not certain that i am doing this correctly. this post is for 'flippinlolly' from england. what you are experiencing is described below. it is perfectly normal for an athlete BUT it must be monitored and i would recommend seeing a doctor no later than your 16th birthday assuming you are fast approaching that date. there are other medical conditions that can cause the same symptoms which is why it cannot be overlooked.

this is also good information for any parent that reads here as your daughter is approaching puberty/menarche and trains several hours a week in a physically demanding sport. safe training!

» Amenorrhea

Some female athletes experience amenorrhea, an absence of a normal menstrual cycle. Once dismissed as harmless, amenorrhea is coming under increased scrutiny. In most cases, treatment is simple, but questions remain about the long-term effects of amenorrhea.
It appears that amenorrhea can result from a variety of factors, including hormonal imbalances, low body weight, low percentage of body fat, etc. Eating disorders, such as bulimia and anorexia, can also cause amenorrhea.




Some of the factors which contribute to amenorrhea are under your control:
  • Nutrition - some athletes are undernourished. Chronically consuming too few calories and, specifically, insufficient protein are risk factors.
  • Weight - excessive thinness can add to your risk of amenorrhea.
  • Sport - obviously there are many benefits associated with regular exercise and physical conditioning. However, excessive exercise and going to extremes in physical conditioning can cause problems.
What are the long-term consequences of amenorrhea? There is no current conclusive evidence regarding the long-term impact of amenorrhea caused by an eating disorder. However, some concerns have been raised in the following key areas:
Fertility, Stress Fractures and Osteoporosis
It is recommended that you not dismiss the absence of your period as a simple by-product of training. If you have amenorrhea, check with your physician, the College physician, or a member of a Sports Medicine department.
 
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dunno

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well...i'm certainly not posting a question, but the post was successful. guess i lucked out. and i hope that 'flippinlolly' reads this timely.
 
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txgymfan

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Flippinlolly,

I'm glad you are making the mature decision to get yourself checked out. My mom and I did not talk about "those things" either and I did not end up seeing a dr until I was out of college. It is much better to see someone now and make sure your body is working correctly.
 
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Mack_the_Ripper

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Good luck, Flippinlolly!

I have secondary amenorrhea - I got my period when I was 11 (before I was on team), and then lost it about six months ago. I saw my doctor about it, and she wasn't fussed, but my mom and I are a little worried. Sure is convenient though. Won't be convenient when osteoperosis calls my name.
 
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cher062

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When I was a teen I didn't get my period until I was 17 - I was a dancer and like a gymnast had the low body weight and low body fat (what I wouldn't give for that body today). When I was 12 I was concerned that all my friends had their periods and I didn't My DR at that time said they don't even worry about it until you turn 18. Now that was back in the 80's I'm sure things have changed a bit. But my 12yo DD just had her annual physical and she is only 74 lbs and only has 13% BMI - Dr want her to add 100 calories to her meals each day so her BMI is at 20% or higher. When I asked what the risk factors are she said she won't get her period until BMI is closer to 20% or higher. I did ask what medical issues I needed to watch for if she doesn't get her number up and the only issue that the DR said was that it may delay her puberty. Ok DD "sprouted" in the chest dept to where I Know she isn't going to be small chested as she gets bigger. I'm not really concerned at this point about her weight and will offer her food but won't go crazy trying to get those 100 calories into her. If she doesn't get it until she is 17 I'm fine with that.
 

MdGymMom01

Active Member
Mar 5, 2008
2,236
North America
I didn't get my period till I was 15 1/2 years old and I was a distance runner. I was small and thin for my age and the miles that I logged in running were high. Throughout HS my period was very sporadic but when I went to college and put on weight the periods were more regular. As an adult they have become more regular. I think once your body fat and weight adjust to normal--things are fine.
 

julpin4

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Jul 7, 2009
47
Montreal, Canada
Thank you for our post. its something that we don't read often. As a mother of a gymnast of 11 years old, my daugther and i are talking about puberty, but i didn't think about amenorrhea, and she could be a candidate for that !
 
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