For Coaches Back tucks

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gracefulone

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One of my guy friends desparately wants to learn a standing back tuck. He's really fit-he's a great wrestler, played football for 3 years, and now runs varsity cross country his first year out. He's really dedicated to learning it. I have taught standing back tucks before, but only to gymnasts with experience with RO-BHS-BT first. I was wondering about any sort of progression I should have him do. It'll be me and him at an open gym sometime soon, and he has time. He wants to learn it before wrestling season (December).
 
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Geoffrey Taucer

Former Admin
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Former Gymnast
Jan 21, 2007
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Baltimore, MD
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I've seen plenty of athletic teenage guys learn standing back tucks in under an hour.

I'd just let him try it into a pit a few times, and work from there.
 
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gracefulone

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I didn't really think it would be a big issue, but I just wanted to make sure!
 

Valentin

Coach
Coach
Nov 12, 2007
376
USA
Have him do a backward rolls. Can he do it (...NO...humm YES....wicked)
Have him do standing back tuck preps onto a slope than backward roll.. Can he do it without looking over shoulders, and stalling on the roll back... if yes tick.. and move on to spotted back tucks into pit or on tramp or of higher surface to soft surface.

And go from there..

THat is the approach i use with the adults classes i coach. Simple simple simple. Adults are to impatient. They will give up before they have even tried.. I hate coaching adults personally. Except for those that are just there for fitness and variety..no expectations just happy to throw themselves around.
 
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BlairBob

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Get a big spotting block or parallel bar block. Have him lay down with his back and shoulders on the edge.

Arms stretch out horizontally, legs go over head, tuck or pike. You can start the block on it's side low, but possibly not if they are taller. Stand it up on it's tall side as the next step. If they're doing it into pit, I prefer them to do it to their back rather than a 3/4 to their feet.

Straight arm skin the cat on rings. Even better if they have to jump to it at near the top of their vertical leaping ability. Jump up and skin the cat really fast.

If you're strong enough many skills are easier than if you're not as strong and have to have better technique. This can be both good and bad.

Luckily, males under 23 who are fairly active many times lack the common sense to realize the dangers in many of their stunts. It makes perfect sense to them.
 
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gracefulone

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Thanks everyone. I'll let you know how it goes, once we figure out when we're both free.
 

gymdog

Well-Known Member
Coach
Former Gymnast
Proud Relative
Jul 5, 2007
5,121
Have him do a backward rolls. Can he do it (...NO...humm YES....wicked)

I have so many problems with regular backward rolls. I feel like those are the most awkward thing ever. I have to demonstrate for classes and I'm never really sure whether I'll actually make it over or not...there was seriously like a ten year stretch where I never attempted and/or considered attempting a backward roll. Then I tried it again and I was like whaaaaaaatttt is this I suck.

I can do the level 4 straight arm backward roll or piked backward roll with straight arms no problem...but regular backward rolls are tricky little suckers.

Anyway I've seen so many guys learn standing tumbling, mostly tucks. Definitely without RO BHS BT.

Luckily, males under 23 who are fairly active many times lack the common sense to realize the dangers in many of their stunts. It makes perfect sense to them.
23 you say...hmm the clock is ticking down for some I know then...
 
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Rec Coach

Guest
Get a big spotting block or parallel bar block. Have him lay down with his back and shoulders on the edge.

Arms stretch out horizontally, legs go over head, tuck or pike. You can start the block on it's side low, but possibly not if they are taller. Stand it up on it's tall side as the next step. If they're doing it into pit, I prefer them to do it to their back rather than a 3/4 to their feet.

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I've never heard of this one before. Any chance of a video of it? Is the goal to snap your legs around? How difficult are these to land on your feet? Also, I assume your head is hanging off the edge of the mat?
 
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BlairBob

Guest
It's very similar to a back peanut roll/pullover on trampoline. It's important to learn it to just to feet and learn it all the way to their back. Generally on tramp, you learn the back pullover to feet first before over-rotating it to your back.

Their head hangs off the edge. I generally spot by putting my entire arm underneath the shoulder girdle and neck. Basically they just pull the legs in tuck or pike over their head. Eyes focused at ceiling.

Eventually once they can do it from laying all the way back, I have them measure the distance, sit up and do it from a sitting pike. They will either tuck or pike pending ( for very new beginners, I'm more concerned they get over the intial fear and then they will focus on doing it in tuck as tightly as possible before we prep to do it off a mini tramp or spot ).

I don't have any video of it or have seen any at youtube.
 
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