back walkover on beam

gymgirllove

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My daughter is working on her back walkover on beam to train up for next season but she is scared of going backwards. Its a fair fear but she is nearly entirely doing it on her own, with a very very light spot and Im looking for ways to get over the fear. Any ideas?
 
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FlippinPrincess

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Time. And don't put any pressure on her. My daughter has fears with many new beam skills but I let her go at her own pace. I praise her for being brave and continuing to try her best at each practice and that's it. I don't ask her how it's going or anything like that. She may not be the first kid to do a skill but she is one of the cleanest and I have learned that no matter where each kid was at the beginning of the level, they all end up at nearly the same place by competition time.

Let your daughter work through the fear with the help of her coaches. I also find that it's a lot easier for me to let go if I stay out of the gym completely during the new skill phase time. That way my uneducated gymnastics eyes can't "judge" her on whether she should be able to do a skill or not.
 

momofsushi

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from my experience as a mom of a fearfull gymnast on beam, not talking about it, not putting pressure, nothing except being sure that the coach adress it in the good way. I think it's a pretty normal reaction to be afraid of bacwards skils on a beam. Some kids are more cautious than other and a good coach will find the right way to teach the skill.
My daughter (10 years old level 7) is on the way of becoming more confortable on beam but for a long time she was a mess at practive and meets. Coach did an amazing job with small small steps and she was able to do a complete routine with full value at her last meet! IT was a huge success even if she had a fell! She went form a 5 to a 8. something!!
 

wagymmom

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I would just give her more time to practice and gain more confidence. She will get there in time, and asking about it will make her feel more pressure and not help at all.
 
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Annikins

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I just reassure my gymnast that the reason she is scared (of any skill) is because she hasn't practised it enough yet, and so it doesn't feel secure enough yet for her to feel confident in it. When she has practised it more, and it feels more under control, she will naturally get the confidence in it and be happy doing it. I also remind of her of other skills that she has previously been scared to do, but given time has felt confident enough to do. I think sometimes when they are young they can't look ahead to a time when they won't be scared, so they panic about the fact they are scared now, thinking it will always be like that, rather than realising they just need more time to build more confidence in the skill.
 
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Eleven sol

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Avoid talking about it with her unless she brings it up and if she does bring it up, tell her you believe in her and it’ll come. Stay positive and try not to act like it’s a big deal.
 
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haileyyy

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I agree with everyone saying to give it time & not put pressure on her. I had a huge mental block on back walkovers for years and finally got over it this year. She’ll get through it, it just takes a lot of patience.
 
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Ag208

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My daughter is working on her back walkover on beam to train up for next season but she is scared of going backwards. Its a fair fear but she is nearly entirely doing it on her own, with a very very light spot and Im looking for ways to get over the fear. Any ideas?
I found whenever I wa scared of a skill I didn’t know what the root of the problem was.ask her what she’s afraid of doing like is it the fact she thinks her hands are going to slip etc.then reassure her that won’t happen like have your hands ever slipped when your getting spotted.then maybe try telling her to either imagine her coach spotting her or her doing a back-walkover on the floor
 
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Elayne

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from my experience as a mom of a fearfull gymnast on beam, not talking about it, not putting pressure, nothing except being sure that the coach adress it in the good way. I think it's a pretty normal reaction to be afraid of bacwards skils on a beam. Some kids are more cautious than other and a good coach will find the right way to teach the skill.
My daughter (10 years old level 7) is on the way of becoming more confortable on beam but for a long time she was a mess at practive and meets. Coach did an amazing job with small small steps and she was able to do a complete routine with full value at her last meet! IT was a huge success even if she had a fell! She went form a 5 to a 8. something!!
 

Elayne

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Jul 11, 2020
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Time. And don't put any pressure on her. My daughter has fears with many new beam skills but I let her go at her own pace. I praise her for being brave and continuing to try her best at each practice and that's it. I don't ask her how it's going or anything like that. She may not be the first kid to do a skill but she is one of the cleanest and I have learned that no matter where each kid was at the beginning of the level, they all end up at nearly the same place by competition time.

Let your daughter work through the fear with the help of her coaches. I also find that it's a lot easier for me to let go if I stay out of the gym completely during the new skill phase time. That way my uneducated gymnastics eyes can't "judge" her on whether she should be able to do a skill or not.
I’m so glad I ran into your post. My daughter was a level 7 at age 10. She competed last season with no fears. After the break she is back but has fears. She recently got her bhs back, but now won’t budge on her connection. I feel so bad because she is so frustrated. The coach is on it, but some days are better than others. Do I just keep my mouth shut?? Glad your daughter worked through hers.
 
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FlippinPrincess

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I’m so glad I ran into your post. My daughter was a level 7 at age 10. She competed last season with no fears. After the break she is back but has fears. She recently got her bhs back, but now won’t budge on her connection. I feel so bad because she is so frustrated. The coach is on it, but some days are better than others. Do I just keep my mouth shut?? Glad your daughter worked through hers.
I have learned in my very short time as a gym parent that I am best at being a mom and letting the coaches do the coaching. When I know she's struggling, I bite my tongue. I don't ask about it but I do listen to her frustrations when she shares them. I tell her I'm proud of her for her hard work and tell her to just keep doing her best, it will "click" when she's ready. Then I change the subject.

These fears are mental and the more we talk about them the more they think about them. I can honestly say, the less time my husband and I spend in the gym or talking about gym, the faster she she is able to work through her fear. No audience, no pressure.
 
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Elayne

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Thank you for your support. I feel bad because I have talked about it and the other day she said, “I don’t want you to be mad” I told her I don’t care about it and gymnastics is for fun!! Do you think I’ve already ruined it for her??
 

Elayne

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I have learned in my very short time as a gym parent that I am best at being a mom and letting the coaches do the coaching. When I know she's struggling, I bite my tongue. I don't ask about it but I do listen to her frustrations when she shares them. I tell her I'm proud of her for her hard work and tell her to just keep doing her best, it will "click" when she's ready. Then I change the subject.

These fears are mental and the more we talk about them the more they think about them. I can honestly say, the less time my husband and I spend in the gym or talking about gym, the faster she she is able to work through her fear. No audience, no pressure.
 

FlippinPrincess

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Aug 22, 2016
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Thank you for your support. I feel bad because I have talked about it and the other day she said, “I don’t want you to be mad” I told her I don’t care about it and gymnastics is for fun!! Do you think I’ve already ruined it for her??
Of course not! You have not ruined this for her at all. Just try to let it go. (It's hard but it gets easier, I promise.) She will continue to struggle as long as she feels like she is letting you or others down. By staying out of the gym and not asking about it, you are giving her ownership of her sport, allowing her to go at her own pace without judgment or pressure. We need to learn to celebrate the hard work and determination as much as the skill achievement.
 

Elayne

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Of course not! You have not ruined this for her at all. Just try to let it go. (It's hard but it gets easier, I promise.) She will continue to struggle as long as she feels like she is letting you or others down. By staying out of the gym and not asking about it, you are giving her ownership of her sport, allowing her to go at her own pace without judgment or pressure. We need to learn to celebrate the hard work and determination as much as the skill achievement.
You have some really good feedback and advice!!! I’m on it!! Thank you!!!
 
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TumbleTimes4

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My DD had fears of going backwards on beam. She struggled for months with the BHS. I didn’t ask her about it much, but just encouraged her when it did come up. I think it helps to know too that your DD isn’t the only one that has ever experienced a mental block. Knowing that other gymnasts dealt with it too helped her to not feel so alone in the struggle.

Another thing that really helped was a four part series by Doc Ali on getting over mental blocks. It’s on YouTube I believe. It gave my daughter some practical advice and helped her build progressions. I think it helped her feel like she was making progress even if she hadn’t yet done the actual skill on her own. If gave her tools to help reset and a place to start over instead of just standing on a beam waiting to get over the fear.
 
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