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For Parents Do you have a home gym/equipment

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littlekateskate

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I was curious to the parents perspective on home gyms. Do you have equipment at home (anything as simple as a beam line). Do you kids practice on it or play around on it.

If they do have it do their coaches like or dislike them having it? Has it helped? Has it hurt your child?
 

mariposa

Proud Parent
Proud Parent
Sep 25, 2007
3,529
Country
USA
We have stuff. We built her a beam and she has a mat. She got a bar for her b-day.

Honestly I can't say she uses it all that much unless she is struggling with a skill. She learned her mill circle on her bar at home. She just taught herself the L4 beam routine at home on her beam recently.

I think my toddler gets more use out of the stuff. The mat gets used for lots of things. I know that DDs old coach has a bar at home and loans it out to girls struggling with skills and she says her kids practice things on a beam they have at home as well and suggested making DD a beam to help her get more confidence on it. DD has many different coaches now on team. Not sure what they think.

To me, it is play equipment. I never force my DD to practice skills. She plays around more on the stuff than actually doing skills. Unless her gym friends are over, then they are doing skills. Her and DD2 play gymnastics sometimes. DD1 is coach and DD2 is her student. LOL.
 

MyGymStar

New Member
Sep 19, 2007
30
We have a beam, and mat. She really just works routines on it. I havnt noticed it hurting her at all at gym, and alot of the girls at her gym have one.
 

ZJsMom

Active Member
Former Gymnast
Proud Parent
May 11, 2007
998
Pacific NW
Country
USA
Dd has a beam and a mat. Ds has a mushroom. The beam gets a lot of use. Ds probably should use the mushroom more. My kids coaches aren't adverse to home equipment. When dd was struggling with the Level 6 dismount she would do 10 a day at home and it helped a lot. She'll also challenge herself to see how many back walkovers she can stick in a row. I think the extra repetition helps and builds confidence.
 
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greyhoundrescue

Guest
We've got a large studio space that was originally a home dance studio, so there's a ballet barre and walls of mirrors. I bought the kids a ton of mats to roll around on down there. We have one of those "soft" beam-thingies. My girls spend more time "practicing" beam on the white lines of our tennis court (it's grass, so not hard--if it was I wouldn't let them goof around on it) and on the monkey bars at the playground.

I'm just curious, those of you with home bars, where did you get it and how is it mounted/stabilized?
 

gymmomntc2e6

Moderator/Proud Parent
Aug 25, 2007
2,842
North Carolina
We have a floor beam and a mat. That is it. Most of the 'practice' DD does at home is handstands (walking all over the house). She does work on her BWO & BHS on her beam.

To be honest, I don't encourage her to do much at home. I want her to just be able to play when she is at home.
 
We have a low beam in our living room. DD used it more when she first got it than she does now. She gets on it every once in a while to show off to Daddy.

If she had her way, she would get rid of the dining table and living room furniture so that she could have a larger tumbling area. We have already eliminated coffee tables in the family and living rooms. She begs us constantly for a bar, but I know if we had one she would be attempting giants in the house and we just don't have the extra cash for ceiling repairs. :eek:

I don't think her coach minds that we have a beam. I don't try to "coach" DD at home unless her coach points out things that I should help her with at home. Usually it is just stretching or fine tuning arm placements in routines.
 

MdGymMom01

Active Member
Mar 5, 2008
2,236
North America
We just have a low beam and a mat at home. We also have a chin-up bar but that is for pull-ups and leg raises only. I, also, try not to have her do too much stuff at home either. Mostly she just does some conditioning or she will run through some of her beam routine.
 
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Billy

Guest
We have a beam, bar and mats and DD uses them all frequently. In addition, we bought the JO book so I can be sure she's doing skills correctly and she can look at the illustrations. That has been invaluable. In fact, between our equipment and the book, DD taught herself most of the level 3 skills, sufficiently enough that she skipped competing L3 and moved on. It has also helped her get her kip before training them at the gym and helped her to master her cartwheel.
 

MdGymMom01

Active Member
Mar 5, 2008
2,236
North America
We have a beam, bar and mats and DD uses them all frequently. In addition, we bought the JO book so I can be sure she's doing skills correctly and she can look at the illustrations. That has been invaluable. In fact, between our equipment and the book, DD taught herself most of the level 3 skills, sufficiently enough that she skipped competing L3 and moved on. It has also helped her get her kip before training them at the gym and helped her to master her cartwheel.

This is where I would consider drawing the line. Shawn, I know that you want to help your dd in any way that you can, but teaching your child new skills from a book?? I mean isn't that why we pay coaches the money that we do and enroll them at a gym so that they can learn these skills from experts in a safe environment? I know you mean well, as many parents do, but where do you drawn the line in "overcoaching" your own child?

I hope I didn't open a can of worms with that rant! :eek:
 

FlipsLeos

Member
Jul 26, 2008
111
We have a low beam that dh made (6" wide and carpet covered, sits about 2" off the ground) but I think we get more use from the roll of masking tape!! I can make a beam anywhere with that, LOL, and nobody falls off.

The girls don't really do too much on it, although my oldest is struggling with her handstands at the moment and is determined to get it perfected. The little boys tend to use it as a runway for their toy airplanes.

I did ask her coach before we did anything though, and I ask WHAT we can do at home safely. I don't MAKE them do it, but let's face it, little girls have a way of turning everything and anything into gymnastics! I see more little feet in the air these days than I do faces. Most of what she suggests is strength and flexibility related more than any kind of skills practice - like she will tell dd to sit in the splits when watching TV and hold handstands against the wall to work on those arms......
 

bogwoppit

Former Admin
Gold Membership
Former Gymnast
Feb 26, 2007
16,760
Country
Canada
We have some mats and a low beam at home, I have to say the girls really never use them, they just sit there. They are so busy with other stuff on their days off from gym that they don't even think about them and I do not even mention them. When they were little they would put on music and make up floor routines, endless fun, but they did what they wanted.

We had a low bar for a short time, we were not sure about buying it at all and after the youngest tried her BHC on it we gave it to the gym. We were very clear from day one that they could use it for chin ups and pullovers and nothing else, the day that didn't work, it was gone.

It is very easy when our little ones are young and very enthusiastic to try to help and encourage them to get the skills they see the older girls doing, but I really think learning skills should be done in the gym with a coach. I think practicing skills that they have is okay-ish, though I wouldn't let my kids do their back tucks in the house.:eek:

As the parent of an older gymmie who has struggled with injury it is easy to see how easily little ones can overuse their bodies trying and trying to get skills they want. The desire to advance is good and normal, but it is the coaches job to advance them on skill levels.

I have coached and I could very easily help them with their issues, but I would rather little DD, like her big sis, gets her kip in the gym with her team mates around and her coach knowing how she got it. It will take her longer than a kid who got it a home, but it doesn't make her less talented.

I really want my life with my girls to be about anything but gymnastics, I love gym, but I also love doing other stuff with them. We spent most of the weekend hand sewing clothes for American Girl dolls.

Remember there are very few 20 year olds still competing gym, so what else can they learn to enjoy now that they will continue to enjoy as an adult.

Just my humble opinion of course, what you do in your house is your issue, and as always we are here to share and learn from each other.

If they do want to do gym at home, keep it simple and safe, so many injuries at home are from hitting toes etc on tables and doors. They can never do too many handstands.:D
 

MyGymStar

New Member
Sep 19, 2007
30
I agree. I think with the increase of gym hours, the girls start to value there time outside of the gym. We really like to keep it seperate, we let her initiate any convos about gym other than our usual "how was gym tonight". Sometimes she will tell us a week later what happened :) I dont want her to grow up and feel like her value is only based on her gymnastics, but that she is so much more and if she every wants to quit she needs to say the word. We purchased her beam when she was a new level 4, and it definatly got more use when she was working out 9-12 hours a week then now at 24!
 

vmom

Member
Feb 15, 2008
130
DD has two beams at home, a soft foam floor beam (inside) and a low beam that DH made outside. She used to have a trampoline, but it didn't make the move with us last winter, much to dd's dismay. She spent hours on it doing split jumps, straddle jumps, BHS, FHS, and front tucks, by choice! There are rules to using the home stuff. She's not allowed to do anything that she can't do at the gym without a spot. No one else is allowed on the beams, unless it is one of her gym friends. But, when they come over the last thing they want to do is gymnastics, so that has never been a problem. When we had the trampoline, she wasn't allowed to show off for her friends or try to teach them any skills.
The beams pretty much only get used if she is having trouble with a skill or if she is terribly bored and doesn't want to play Guitar Hero:rolleyes:.
 
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Billy

Guest
This is where I would consider drawing the line. Shawn, I know that you want to help your dd in any way that you can, but teaching your child new skills from a book?? I mean isn't that why we pay coaches the money that we do and enroll them at a gym so that they can learn these skills from experts in a safe environment? I know you mean well, as many parents do, but where do you drawn the line in "overcoaching" your own child?

I hope I didn't open a can of worms with that rant! :eek:

Nope, I'm not worried at all. My DD is extremely safety-conscious. She will not attempt any skill that she cannot do comfortably on her own. Furthermore, my daughter is teaching herself, and not just from "a book". She is learning from THE book, the very one sold by USAG that coaches use to teach gymnasts the correct way to do skills and routines. I just make sure that she's safe and using the proper form so she doesn't pick up bad habits. I never, EVER push her to do anything that she doesn't want to do and she never practices unless SHE wants to. I also know that she will soon outgrow her equipment (both physically and skill-wise) anyway and if using it now is fun for her and promotes her love of the sport, then I'm all for it. That is why we bought it for her, after all.
 

Ingymmom

Active Member
Jul 12, 2007
981
No equipment in our home. zero, zilch - despite the years of constant begging from dd. ;) I don't spot, don't correct, I don't even tell her to point her toes. Love that our coaches take care of that all :p Then I can sit back & enjoy my mommy job of saying OMG, that was the best one (of whatever) ever - even when it wasn't:D!

My reasons are not for safety (dd bangs herself up doing things in the house without any gym equipment) or for form (they can develop bad habits in and out of the gym). I simply enjoy the fact that after how many hours she has spent in the gym over the last year, she still LOVES, LOVES, LOVES going. There is always something she is excited about getting to the gym to do again, and I have always wondered if allowing home equipment would take away from that. Guess I will never know:D

on the other hand, I really (since I am a parent and not a coach) don't care if other peeps have home equipment. Most everyone we know has it, and their kids still seem to enjoy gym as well (for the most part). USAG sells their info publicly so if a parent wants to pick it up, no big deal. Same for equipment, the majority of the kids seem to use it for fun (like a jungle gym, or a play set). If a parent wants to purchase - great.

I have however had a bad experience with home equipment that rubbed me the wrong way & because of it I don't at all agree when parents use their equipment to increase their gymmies gym time, or to perfect their gym skills, or correct their form etc... I watched a talented little gymmie go from loving gym, to absolutely hating because of it. :(
 
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TeamDad

Guest
Shawn,

I can completely understand a parents desire to have their dd advance in this sport. I can also understand a child's need to try and live up to a parents expectations and seek approval. Sometimes it can seem like a waste of time when coaches aren't making these corrections on your time table. I also understand why most if not all gyms, coaches, head coaches and directors would be against what you are doing at home and would feel that you are crossing the line. They will likely want you to be patient and believe in their program and the way that they approach.

Some gyms might have a written policy, others an unwritten one. I would suggest that you consult with them and get their read on your situation, or tell your dd to never say anything to her coaches about it. If they find out the wrong way, you could be in for a confrontation that is bound to produce alot of hurt feelings, especially since you seem to feel so strongly about having these corrections made sooner than later.

*edit* I am speaking about coaching at home out of the JO handbook and not about having a home gym.
 
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Billy

Guest
Shawn,

I can completely understand a parents desire to have their dd advance in this sport. I can also understand a child's need to try and live up to a parents expectations and seek approval. Sometimes it can seem like a waste of time when coaches aren't making these corrections on your time table. I also understand why most if not all gyms, coaches, head coaches and directors would be against what you are doing at home and would feel that you are crossing the line. They will likely want you to be patient and believe in their program and the way that they approach.

Some gyms might have a written policy, others an unwritten one. I would suggest that you consult with them and get their read on your situation, or tell your dd to never say anything to her coaches about it. If they find out the wrong way, you could be in for a confrontation that is bound to produce alot of hurt feelings, especially since you seem to feel so strongly about having these corrections made sooner than later.

*edit* I am speaking about coaching at home out of the JO handbook and not about having a home gym.

Thanks for your well thought out reply. I am not trying to second guess nor rush the coaches' training program. I allow my DD to practice at home because she wants to. And I use the resources at my disposal to ensure both her safety and the accuracy of her home practice so that she doesn't have issues with bad form at the gym. I also tell her anything her coaches have told her supersedes anything I might say, that I am not a coach and they certainly know better than I when it comes to gymnastics.

DD's coaches know that she practices at home. Last night they had her demonstrating her glide swing and her kip to some of her teammates now that they are starting to train them. DD is the only one on the team to have her kip. The HC/O has told me that she is not at all worried about DD's bars, not now at level 4 and not in the future at level 10. Her bar work is exceptional. I also believe that the coaches would not have let her skip L3 if her skills were not up to par. We must be doing something right.
 
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Jan 22, 2008
437
We have a bar, beam, mat and trampoline. Actuall DD has a beam inside and one outside. DD Practices freqently and I have to say I do help and spot her and such. I used to coach Many years ago. DD's coach knows that I do work with her and I mostly work on skills that she is currently training. Sometimes for fun DD will ask to work on something and as long as I know it is something coming I will start to work with her. Her coach doesn't have an issue with it and knows that she is doing it only for fun.

I don't see anything wrong with what Shawn is doing. Heck I have been known to correct DD's form a time or two. Sometimes I start before coach is correcting it. I just make sure not to over step my bounds. HC and I are on the same page 99.9% of the time. Also Coach knows that dd is teaching herself things on the trampoline. DD has her whipback, tuck and coach is fine with her having those skills before actually training them. I have even had her look at them for form to make sure she wasn't seeing something I was missing. I never taugh DD how to do them she just figured it out. She is young and having fun and I know she is very cautious. She does have fear which is a VERY good thing for her.
 
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