Front Hip Circles

Status
Not open for further replies.

AlexsGymmyMom

Active Member
Proud Parent
Mar 20, 2009
2,532
USA
Hi, I am new here and looking for a little advice.
My daughter is really struggling with the front hip circle. It seems to me that she does not get the momentum she needs to get all the way around and she is pulling away from the bar instead of down on the bar so her body ends up away from the bar. At open gym this past Saturday one of the coaches put her on a training bar with what looked like a large rubber band going across the bar. She had her put her legs through the band and practice her hip circle. I watched her practice and she did come up into a front support but only because the band was holding her as she sat on it and then with bent arms pushed herself on up. To me it seemed counter productive since she was not using her own momentum to get around. I hope this makes sense. If you have any other ideas that would be great and if you could tell me what the benefit of the band aroung the bar is also. Thanks!
 
Did ChalkBucket help you?... help us too.

If you can't help financially... tell a friend about us!
The band helps the kids to know what a front hip circle feels like. It helps them understand when to shift their hands, but provides support so they can work on it slowly. Front hip circles are more about timing then they are about a lot of momentum, the momentum you need is established by timing of when you pike in the front hip circle and when you shift your arms.
The band is alright. Front hip circles are one of the hardest skills for young gymnasts to learn in my opinion.
I hope your daughter gets it soon!

gymmer
 

Linsul

Active Member
Sep 19, 2008
876
Pripyat
Don't be discouraged by drills you see! There are many many many drills for each skill, each designed to familiarize with or improve an aspect of that skill. Gymnasts need to learn when power, flexibility, or body shape come into play. Isolating those things so they can concentrate on them without distraction is to help them understand what they need to do or add finesse to what they already know.

It sounds like the coach thinks your DD may be so caught up in the details that it was time to let her experience the skill fully and make her mental connections regarding what she needs to do physically. Sometimes all the explaining and theory in the world doesn't teach as much as the experience itself. Even if her circles look 'bad' she is processing what works (or doesn't work), why it works (or not), and most importantly, learning the how and why of making changes to your skills for the better. She'll get it, they are a challenging skill and it may take time, but if she continues it won't escape her forever!
 

AlexsGymmyMom

Active Member
Proud Parent
Mar 20, 2009
2,532
USA
Thanks so much for the replies! I knew there had to be a reason for it but I did'nt know what it was. That makes sense! I hope she gets it soon because she gets so frustrated and right now feels defeated and thinks she will NEVER get it! Until now she has gotten her skills easily so this is a new experience for her! She will get through it. Thanks again for your answers!
 

KAQuinlan

Member
Mar 6, 2009
93
Florida Panhandle
I agree with the other responses and don't have anything to add to them. I thought that you might like this strengthening drill that your daughter can do at home. I had a young lady recently that was struggling with the end of her FHC. I sent her home with this drill and she came back and got it! She was already really close, so don't expect your daughter to have the same experience, if you decide to try it!

The drill is similar to a V-up. Start by lying on your back with arms down by your side. Sit up to V-sit and push down on the floor at the same time so that your rear end rises up off the floor. It helps work on timing, but it also strengthens the specific muscles that help hold the legs up and push down on the bar at the end of the FHC.

I hope that she gets it soon! And don't be afraid to ask your coach the same question that you just asked here! As a coach, I would be disappointed to think that a parent might question why I'm having a child do a drill or skill a specific way, but never ask me about it. As long as you ask in a reasonable manner (as I think that you did here), most coaches would be happy to explain the purpose of the drill. Of course, we here are always happy to help :)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Thank you for supporting our sponsors Energym Music & Norberts!