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How on earth do you do this?!?!

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CHSgymnast16

Member
May 3, 2008
78
OHIO
Ok, so I was working on cast handstands before my injury. My coach wanted meto start working on kip cast handstands. Just one problem, I don't know how to do them! I asked her how to do them, but she hasn't got to me about it since my injury. Can anyone explain explain how to do them and anything that I can do to simulate them while im injured? (Ankle injury)
 

gymdog

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Jul 5, 2007
5,121
Start with kip to immediate fast front hip circle (this will help you get your shoulders over the bar for the cast HS). If you're straddling up, you could also do kip, straddle on, jump/press up to HS. That would probably be more helpful if you didn't already have a cast HS. If you can do a kip cast, and a cast to HS, then you're just doing a kip cast into HS. If all the strength is there, then it's a question of finishing in a good "sandwich" position with the shoulders over the bar and the feet in front to get backward momentum out of the kip.
 
Jul 12, 2008
90
Charleston, WV
My advice would be that when you do the kip and land in support to try to keep your feet in front of you so that you can get a good swing into the cast itself. If you do a kip with your hips flat, your feet are going to be right underneath you and its going to be almost impossible to do a straight body cast.
 
K

KBT

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Keep in mind that the kip-cast handstand is really one continuous skill rather than a kip followed by a cast handstand. The cast starts partway through the kip. When you bring your toes to the bar to kip, that's when the cast starts. Keep your toes by the bar for a little bit longer than you typically would so as you come up to front support you will still be a bit piked around the bar instead of in a straight body with legs pointing towards the floor. As you come up to front support, whip your legs down and up into the cast.

Practicing the planche position while you're injured would be good. It feels awkward to lean that far over the bar and you'll need the planche strength. Also practicing bouncing up to handstand on a floor bar with one of those bungee cord things will help get the feel of that position.
 

Geoffrey Taucer

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Jan 21, 2007
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Start with kip to immediate fast front hip circle (this will help you get your shoulders over the bar for the cast HS). If you're straddling up, you could also do kip, straddle on, jump/press up to HS. That would probably be more helpful if you didn't already have a cast HS. If you can do a kip cast, and a cast to HS, then you're just doing a kip cast into HS. If all the strength is there, then it's a question of finishing in a good "sandwich" position with the shoulders over the bar and the feet in front to get backward momentum out of the kip.

I dissagree with the kip front hip circle; the weight shift is similar, but the placement of the hips and position of the shoulders is different.

The key is that as you finish your kip, you have to bring your shoulders forward hard and fast to get ready for the cast. The kip shouldn't finish in support; it should finish leaning way forward past support.

This is how I teach kips right from the beginning; a little later than necessary on the start and on the push down, which results in your shoulders finishing leaning forward. If you do this correctly, a cast to horizontal happens more or less on its own; you don't really have a choice but to cast if you kip correctly. From there it's simply a matter of pushing down on the bar and pressing, much like a press handstand (or rather a planche handstand).

One thing you can work on at home is a press/planche down from handstand. Go up to handstand, then press down as much as you can with a straight or slightly hollowed body. This will work the shoulder muscles needed to get that cast up to handstand, as well as working your core to help you stay tight.
 
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gymdog

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Jul 5, 2007
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I dissagree with the kip front hip circle; the weight shift is similar, but the placement of the hips and position of the shoulders is different.

It's been the most effective thing for people who have the strength but not the timing in my experience. I agree it isn't exactly the same thing. I called it a front hip circle, but done immediately out of the kip (without pushing up to the thighs) the front hip probably won't be completed (i.e. it's more of a fast roll down). I learned this trick from a national team coach at a bar clinic, and it was especially helpful for girls who were struggling with the timing of straddle cast to HS (not leaning over and piking enough initially). He had them to kip immediate front hip, then spotted it by pushing the feet back to make the front hip faster and more of a straight body line. Then he had them try to kip cast handstand...the first few tended to planche right over the bar until they realized the push back action, but several got it right then and I've seen it work for others since. Of course if you're lacking the strength or the kip is too weak to do the FHC immediately, then it isn't going to be successful.
 
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