K12

mommyof1

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Jan 31, 2012
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Has anyone’s child taken on-line courses through K12? Our school district is making noises about cutting pre-IB (our district’s version of honors) courses for both the in-person and on-line options, so we will likely be forced to homeschool this year. I have found solid accredited on-line options for everything but 9th-grade English. K12 offers an “honors” English 9, but based on the syllabus it appears that the “honors” designation is only window dressing. We are planning to use CTY for most other subjects, but the only real English course CTY offers is AP English Language and Composition, which is aimed at 11th-graders. Can anyone speak to the quality of K12, or point me to other options?
 
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gymgal

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In case you don't get any answers here, if you are on FB, I would recommend searching for K12 groups. There may be one in your state as well. You will get lots of answers there. My children went through Connections academy for high school. From what I have heard from other parents who have tried both, the two programs are very similar in terms of curriculum. The honors designation on courses translated to more material covered, 1-2 extra projects/papers, and higher expectations when grading.
 
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gymgal

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Oh, if NCAA eligibility is a concern, be careful with K12. Many of their charter schools lost affiliation with NCAA a few years ago. Not sure what is happening with that now and whether it affects the national school, which I believe is the only way you can piecemeal courses?
 

mommyof1

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Oh, if NCAA eligibility is a concern, be careful with K12. Many of their charter schools lost affiliation with NCAA a few years ago. Not sure what is happening with that now and whether it affects the national school, which I believe is the only way you can piecemeal courses?
Yes, we are looking at the K12 national school for individual courses. NCAA eligibility is not a serious concern unless Tinker Bell decides to take up another sport within the next couple of years and turns out to be a prodigy, which seems unlikely. Although we do face some uncertainty about transferring credits back in to the public school, and I am wondering whether NCAA certification would provide additional legitimacy and make it harder for the school to argue against granting credit (apparently accreditation is not enough to guarantee that a course will be accepted for transfer).
 

raenndrops

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Thanks--I had not heard of this program! I like the course description.
I only know about Apex because when I did my student teaching 5 or so years ago, I was with a cooperating teacher who taught the exact same math class 6 periods a day (it had 2 different names, but same book, same lessons, same homework). My advisor and my cooperating teacher knew that my ultimate goal was to be a teacher at an online school.

The high school had a computer lab where students could do credit recovery for previously failed courses during regular school time instead of having to go to summer school or repeat the class. It was called the PACE Lab. They used Apex for their credit recovery.

They were required to have a licensed teacher in the lab with the students to grade some of the work (paper work that wasn't MC / TF - Apex provided the answer "key" with suggestions of what to look for in the answers). They had a French teacher - she was 50% French teacher, so they supplemented with 50% PACE Lab so she would be considered full-time. She was usually good unless someone had a math question. Since I wanted to do online teaching eventually, I split my time too. When I actually had to take over in the classroom, my advisor, coop teacher, and I agreed that I would only take over her class for 2 periods a day ... they happened to be the 2 periods the PACE Lab was closed.
 

raenndrops

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Yes, we are looking at the K12 national school for individual courses. NCAA eligibility is not a serious concern unless Tinker Bell decides to take up another sport within the next couple of years and turns out to be a prodigy, which seems unlikely. Although we do face some uncertainty about transferring credits back in to the public school, and I am wondering whether NCAA certification would provide additional legitimacy and make it harder for the school to argue against granting credit (apparently accreditation is not enough to guarantee that a course will be accepted for transfer).
Since K12 is a public School option, the credits should transfer back to your local public school. As long as your student is taking classes that fulfill the requirements of your regular public school, there shouldn't be an issue.
HOWEVER, if your school requires for example 1 YEAR of US Government but your student only takes 1 semester of government because that is what the online school requires for graduation so all they offer, the other semester will have to be made up.
This example happened to a student I tutored several years ago. She had fallen behind in 9th grade (her mom wasn't having her come to me regularly at the time) and had to go to summer school. After summer school and the first semester of 10th grade (where she was only coming over 1x a month), she was even farther behind, so her mom switched her to an online school that I suggested ... This student was the reason I went to grad school and got my teaching license.
Once she was doing online, she was at my house 5 days a week, 4 hours a day. I managed to get her not only caught up, but she was actually ahead. She stayed through the end of her junior year and was actually 0.5 credit away from being able to graduate from the online school (and if she had finished one of her other classes 2 weeks earlier, she could have done another class, lol). She would have graduated early and her mom realized how close she was and FREAKED a little. She wasn't ready for her oldest baby to graduate, so she switched her back to the local school for her senior year. They had a higher graduation credit requirement, so she needed to take 1 semester of government, 1 semester of speech, and either a year long or 2 semester long electives. She went to school mornings only and had a job in the afternoon.
 

mom2557

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DD took 4 classes through K12 International Academy for 7th grade. The curriculum was challenging. I think as important as the curriculum is who is teaching the course, otherwise you can just buy independent study versions of the courses directly through K12. There are a number of private online schools use K12 as their curriculum - George Washington University Online High School, K12 International Academy and the Keystone School are a few that I can think of. Many states use K12 as their public online school curriculum. As for CTY, DD tested into the program but it is $$$ and we found that they used thinkwellhomeschool.com curriculum for at least some of their math courses (at least the one she was planning to take), so what you are really paying for is the teacher, which is great, and like I said, what I consider to be as important as the curriculum. Good luck!
 
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