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Level 8 vaults

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flippinfun

New Member
Aug 8, 2008
9
My dd is training level 8. SHe doesn't have a great handspring vault but managed to pull of mid- high 8s all season. Now the coachhas her training Tsuks. Would a yurchenko be better for her since her handsprings were just OK or is Tsuk the choice for most level 8s. SHe is one f the only ones in her gym doing 8 so it ishard to compare.
 
B

BlairBob

Guest
If her round off and back tumbling is good, you can train yurchenko. This can be as simple as if they can back tumble in a straight line. If they go crooked, that's not gonna work.

For tsuk, you should have mastered a decent handspring. It's just another way to go if you're not really going to go towards handspring front vaults.
Did she only compete a front handspring in L8 and that is why her scores were so, well mid 8's? ( handspring isn't worth much, but handspring full can be tough to land well)

You say her handsprings were just ok? Were they ok, or do they have a nice float and good pop off the table. No bent arms or limbering off the table ( I hope a L8 isn't doing that like a 5 ). I'm really only concerned as to how much power she has in the run, off the board and table. As for form or landing errors, that's not the issue here.

How is her round off in any case since you still have to be able to block well to set up for the flip or handspring.

Generally, tsuk is learned before yurchenko, but many gyms well start yurchenko drills in compulsories as simple as round off the board and run, punch, round off. A good compulsory could do this in 4 or 5, but by 6 they should be able to work on that. They might not get towards doing round off back whip or back tuck/lay until they have those skills in 6 or 7.
 

gymnomore

Member
Aug 3, 2007
208
While we're on the subject of level 8 vaults, I have one too (Hope you don't mind). My dd does a tsuk, but she has also done a front handspring front tuck, which she learned quite easily. But, she will be competing a tsuk, mainly because that seems to be the natural order of progression after a front handspring or handspring-full. My question is: Is the start value of a front handspring front tuck higher than a tsuk? I've never gotten a clear answer on this one. Thanks to anyone who can help me!
 

Granny Smith

Active Member
Proud Parent
Jun 21, 2007
1,444
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USA
I was under the assumption that a FHS-FT can not be done in L8, the earliest it can be used is L9.
 

gymdog

Well-Known Member
Coach
Former Gymnast
Proud Relative
Jul 5, 2007
5,121
You're correct, no front flipping on vault in L8. In L9, the start value of a FHS FT is higher than pike tsuk.
 

gymnomore

Member
Aug 3, 2007
208
Oh thank you so much. I forgot to mention, the front handspring front tuck would be for when she competes the high school season. This is easier to her then the tsuk, but she hasn't done it in awhile. If the start value is higher (and now I know it is) then it might be a good time to revive this skill. Wonder what the start value is? Are high school start values the same in all states?
Sorry for the hijack.
 
Jul 12, 2008
90
Charleston, WV
Most people go ahead and learn the tsuk before the yurchenko because it is easier and you can learn it alot faster. A good yurchenko usually takes a year to learn. Plus if you get to a competition and the gymnast is having problems with their yurchenko, they can always go back and compete the tsuk.
 

gym law mom

Active Member
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Dec 23, 2006
2,527
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USA
My gymmie is also training L8. They have all the girls doing tsuks and at least yurchenko timers. My gymmie can now "flip" her tucked tsuk onto a landing mat, but doesn't really like the tsuk at much at the yurchenko. She's always been a pretty strong vaulter and is hoping the coaches will let her do the yurchenko. Right now, she's flipping a tucked one into the pit from porta table. Last year, all of our L8s did piked tsuks except for one that did the fhs(injured and just couldn't get a tsuk in time for the season). This year the coaches really seem to be encouraging the yurchenko since thats what they want competed by all as L9s.

Gynomore---My gymmie really wants to learn the fhs-ft. She would be so envious of you dd!! Maybe once they settle on a vault for her for this year, she can start working it.
 

gymdog

Well-Known Member
Coach
Former Gymnast
Proud Relative
Jul 5, 2007
5,121
Oh thank you so much. I forgot to mention, the front handspring front tuck would be for when she competes the high school season. This is easier to her then the tsuk, but she hasn't done it in awhile. If the start value is higher (and now I know it is) then it might be a good time to revive this skill. Wonder what the start value is? Are high school start values the same in all states?
Sorry for the hijack.

They aren't the same in all states, but a lot of states use similar rules because there is like a national high school league rules (forget the official name). Under those rules the front front would be a higher start than a pike tsuk. I would imagine virtually any rules would have it as a higher start value unless the rules had a pike tsuk as a 10.
 

flippinfun

New Member
Aug 8, 2008
9
She competed 7 last season that is why the handspring vault. I think she has trouble blocking but she also throws her read out. Her back tumbling has always been her strong point Maybe that is what is confusing me the most.
If her round off and back tumbling is good, you can train yurchenko. This can be as simple as if they can back tumble in a straight line. If they go crooked, that's not gonna work.

For tsuk, you should have mastered a decent handspring. It's just another way to go if you're not really going to go towards handspring front vaults.
Did she only compete a front handspring in L8 and that is why her scores were so, well mid 8's? ( handspring isn't worth much, but handspring full can be tough to land well)

You say her handsprings were just ok? Were they ok, or do they have a nice float and good pop off the table. No bent arms or limbering off the table ( I hope a L8 isn't doing that like a 5 ). I'm really only concerned as to how much power she has in the run, off the board and table. As for form or landing errors, that's not the issue here.

How is her round off in any case since you still have to be able to block well to set up for the flip or handspring.

Generally, tsuk is learned before yurchenko, but many gyms well start yurchenko drills in compulsories as simple as round off the board and run, punch, round off. A good compulsory could do this in 4 or 5, but by 6 they should be able to work on that. They might not get towards doing round off back whip or back tuck/lay until they have those skills in 6 or 7.
 
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BlairBob

Guest
It's not very rare for girls to do hand front vaults. Basically a requires a lot of power like a good and not thrown tsuk. A tsuk will also teach you the same chest up off the table that is necessary before the flip.

If she's doesn't have a good handspring, I'm wondering if she just isn't generating enough power in the run and punch or pop off the table. However, this could be a wall so the coach will no better. If you can't generate a lot of power, but have a good round off, it might be better to go tsuk or yurchenko.
 
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