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Junior Olympic New Recruiting Rules?

Texastwister

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Oh my goodness it's not that hard....I was simply saying that yes, clearly if any verbals are made now they would have to be done secretly as doing it "above the table" would clearly show that rules were broken.
So the rules are being broken. Got it!!!
 

Jazzjerz

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I think it was confusing when you said you wouldn’t imply such a thing would happen. I read that as sarcasm, btw.
 

gymgal

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You guys all need to wake up... verbals are all "under the table" as signed contracts are what happen "on the table".
yes, but it is even more so now because there is not a public announcement putting both parties on the hook for it. Obviously either could break the break the verbal before but it didn't go unnoticed. Now it will because it would be against the rules to have one in the first place so no one is going to complain about it.
 
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skschlag

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yes, but it is even more so now because there is not a public announcement putting both parties on the hook for it. Obviously either could break the break the verbal before but it didn't go unnoticed. Now it will because it would be against the rules to have one in the first place so no one is going to complain about it.
Exactly... So now, if anyone hears about it, schools could technically be "punished" for the violation. So if it does happen, and I truly hope that the college coaches, club coaches, and parents do not let it happen, then the kiddo now not only has to make a big decision young, they also have to keep that big secret for years. I really hope, though, that they follow the rules. (i know, maybe a bit naive)
 

JBS

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As a coach that coaches his own kids... I just can't imagine a kid making this decision. And one of my daughters is an 8th grade 3rd year level 10. This is all very real... very very real. The new rules are a good change... this all needs to stop.
 
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FlippinPrincess

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As a coach that coaches his own kids... I just can't imagine a kid making this decision. And one of my daughters is an 8th grade 3rd year level 10. This is all very real... very very real. The new rules are a good change... this all needs to stop.
Mine isn't even close to us considering college gymnastics and even I am super excited about these changes. I have always thought it was absurd to be recruiting 12 or 13 year old children for college. No matter how you spin it, I have yet to hear a truly beneficial and/or valid reason why recruiting that young even occurs.
 

gymbeam

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No doubt it will happen.
Mine isn't even close to us considering college gymnastics and even I am super excited about these changes. I have always thought it was absurd to be recruiting 12 or 13 year old children for college. No matter how you spin it, I have yet to hear a truly beneficial and/or valid reason why recruiting that young even occurs.
This has always been my thought as well. Seems so much can change in the years before they get to college (and always a chance new talent can come along in the interim who may be even better matches for your team), but I guess if you’re one of the top programs you know people will commit to you early so it becomes a race between the top teams to get the best first.

And I just don’t know that there will ever be enough rules in place to truly curb the early recruitment communication in all forms...
 

sce

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The new rules are also having an effect on other sports. I just had a friend whose son committed to a D1 school for golf. He is in 9th grade. I was actually really surprised (not that he was recruited- he is an amazing talent who has already qualified for major tournaments- meaning ones that I have heard of and seen on tv- lol!) because other than gymnastics, I really didn't think that early recruiting was a "thing" for other sports- certainly not golf!
Recruiting is a thing for every division 1 sport, I think d2 and d3 as well.
 

Akl597

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Recruiting is a thing for every division 1 sport, I think d2 and d3 as well.
Yep, I'm sure early recruiting happens in every sport. We probably just don't know/hear about it as much because we're not in those circles. Last year, the head of our school told me that college coaches were contacting a 7th grader who was on the varsity basketball team. He said it was not allowed, but it didn't stop them from trying. I was also watching the girl's high school basketball state championships this year and they were talking about two freshman that were already committed to our state university. I think the new rules seem like a step in the right direction. As long as people follow them.
 
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3cats

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Do you all feel the same about a 12 year old genius who finishes high school early to start college?!?
This isnt a fair question. The purpose of college is an education. If a genius has completed all courses of study in a traditional highschool then yes they are now ready for college.

(This isn't how it is usually done, however. Mearly bc of the social aspect. My cousin's daughter is a genius and took individually taught classes at a college from late elementary school on through high school to supplement her education. But graduated school with her peers)

A child who may be at the top of his or her game in a sport but has years and years of school to finish also has years and years of something to derail that talent in the sport. Be it injury or disenfranchisement with the sport.

Also a young student who educationally excels probably has a more solid idea of what they would like to study in college and what college offers classes to meet his or her needs. (Although I have heard that even these students may feel excessive pressure to succeed from all around them and also burn out during or after the college experience)

An 8th grader who excels at his or her sport will only have a rudimentary idea. And much of that will be the direct influence of the people around the child.

My biggest concern is that a child may feel even more pressure to continue a sport that they have grown to despise qand/or to continue to go to a college that they dont feel connected to, and/or continue with a major that is offered at a school that they aren't in to. All because they feel they made a commitment on behalf of their coach, their parent, and their whole little world that means so much to a young human.

It's too much pressure.
 

suds

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My biggest concern is that a child may feel even more pressure to continue a sport that they have grown to despise qand/or to continue to go to a college that they dont feel connected to, and/or continue with a major that is offered at a school that they aren't in to. All because they feel they made a commitment on behalf of their coach, their parent, and their whole little world that means so much to a young human.

It's too much pressure.

Therein lies a parenting paradox:

Lovingly, and fully, support our child’s interests and ambitions, yet with equal vigor, ensure that it is safe for our child to change their mind and walk away, at any time, if they want – and be fully supportive of this choice as well.

At first glance this approach may seem antithetical to “success”, yet ironically when a child knows they are truly empowered to walk away at any time, they tend to enjoy the sport / etc. much more.
 

sce

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Do you all feel the same about a 12 year old genius who finishes high school early to start college?!?
If they have completed high school, then starting college makes sense. But colleges have programs to help them, because they are not as meture as the traditional student. The issue people are having is committing to something years before thye will do it, so much can change in those years.
 

Sk8ermaiden

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The parents I know of exceptionally gifted children do anything possible to challenge them educationally while NOT sending them to college at 12.

But someone who is light years ahead intellectually/educationally, committing to the next step on their educational path (which would conceivably happen right then) is not even remotely related to someone who is gifted physically committing to the next step on their educational path (which will conceivably happen 6 years from now.) A lot happens in 6 years. This isn't an appropriate comparison at all.
 

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