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dazed

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Hi. I still pop in from time to time and I really enjoy some of the topics you all are talking about. It's giving me a little insight into what I may be looking at in the future if my daughter continues in gymnastics....and I am so hoping she does! :) I am feeling a little out place however when people are talking about different moves they, or their children, have accomplished or are having trouble with. Hopefully soon I'll understand what the heck you're all talking about, lol. My only thing to contribute so far is my daughter just finished a fun meet this last weekend and did well from what I was told...I had to work. She really had a great time and I am looking forward to when she can participate in actual competition. I wish you all the best!
 

bluefeet

Coach/Proud Parent
May 14, 2007
37
Michigan
Hi Dazed,

Boy can I relate! You'd think after 12 years I would have picked up on more of the lingo. "Having no life" as my kids like to remind me, I've spent countless hours hanging around the gym. But more just for the infectious atmosphere than anything.

As I mentioned in my intro, I just started working with our junior trainer girls a month ago - primarily on bars/vault. Not two hours ago I congratulated a little one on how nice her back handspring looked.........we were on bars! :p

Anyway...the first thing I did was pick up the USAG Women's Jr. Olympic Compulsory Program Exercises. I believe L1-L4 & L5+L6 come as a set. You can usually find a few on Ebay for around $25-$30. Or maybe your gym can lend them to you.

They are an EXCELLANT source for understanding the core requirements at these levels, on each event. The DVDs outline the skills for you, then have demonstrations in both real speed & slow motion. Good stuff.

As a rookie coach I'm still struggling in the 'corrective action' department, but studying these videos has definitely helped in identifying problem areas...and certainly with the communication aspect.

Looking WAY back, it would have been nice to know some of these basics - if nothing more but to make those fun conversations with my daughter a little more two way....me: "cool...you made your little flip around thingy" ;)
 

bogwoppit

Former Admin
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Feb 26, 2007
16,527
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Check out the following site,

http://www.gymnasticsrevolution.com/GymInteractive-Index.htm

it shows slow motion each skill required in levels 1-6, each one is explained quite nicely. You will be able to learn the names very easily. Brian Bakalar, I believe, is the club owner, if you dig around the site he has some great articles about gymnasts, gymnastics and parenting a gymnast. Very good reading.

Hope it helps, it is also free, I do love free anything.:)
 
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dazed

Guest
Thank you bluefeet! lol. I had to laugh at your " little flip-around thingy" because that's exactly how I talk. Makes my conversations with my daughter pretty confusing when we can't decipher what the other is saying, hehehe.
 
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hammy

Guest
The link is a great way to see what some of the tricks are. I've watched a few and noticed that they are not performed entirely correct, but it is still a great way to get an idea of what the tricks are.

Ex: -on the underswing on bars--the hips should not drop that low below the bar
-on the baby giant on bars you are not to end bent over the bar, the gymnast should shift their wrists and end in front support on the bar (the hips should not slam down on the bar)

My judgements aside (sorry--i'm a critical person when it comes to showing videos because I feel that things should always be explained properyl) the website is an excellent way to help parents put skills with names. I remember parents calling stuff the "that flippy twisty thingy you do on floor".
 
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