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Plyometrics?

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Tim_Dad

Member
Nov 3, 2008
414
Region IV (Missouri)
Do any of the coaches here use plyometrics as part of the conditioning programs for gymnasts?

And if so, can you provide an example of HOW Plyometrics are included?

I've been doing a fair about of reading on the subject, and it's interesting to me. However, it's almost a akin to reading a "get rich quick" book. Not that I read those, but I mean, just reading about someones success doesn't help me become foreever-wealthy. I need to first understand the concepts and programs. For this, I need better 'visuals' before I think I 'get it'.
 
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BlairBob

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In the fitness world, this is generally considered to be talking about leg movements. There was a russian scientist who determined an athlete should be able to squat 1.5xBW before doing any plyometric training.

However, in gymnastics it's done all the time. HS hops are a plyometic action just like pushup hopping, bounding on one's forefoot, jumping squats ( from the deck or in a lunge or on one leg ). Care must be taken that the gymnast is strong enough to move through the RangeOfMotion with control before explosively ( "isokinetic" movement- this term is something of a misnomer but we'll go with it for now ).

For example:

First we train a static HS. Then we train shrugging the shoulders in a handstand at a specific tempo ( controlled speed ). Then we train the HS block or pop.

Mark Young once stated that in a clinic I went that reps should not be exceeded of 100r per workout.
 

KAQuinlan

Member
Mar 6, 2009
93
Florida Panhandle
We use plyometrics (the leg version) as a warm up for all our tumbling and upper intermediate through advanced classes. We throw out all the panel mats and trap blocks on the floor. Taller, stronger girls use the trap blocks. We do each "skill" for 15 seconds. Then, we go through it again. If there is time and the class is not too large, then we line up about 6 panel mats with about 2 feet between each. The class lines up in two rows and jumps on/off, on top, & over, then does it all sideways, then does bear walks each of those ways. It actually goes pretty quickly since there are two kids going at a time and the next two can start before the first two are finished. Younger kids love the last half of the warm-up. Older kids don't care for any of it, but we've never had anyone leave over it and by the end of the year they can all do the first half of the warm-up for 30 seconds each time. We like it because it helps their aerobic endurance a little (not much, but a bit), it strengthens their leg muscles, and more than anything -- with those tumblers -- it teaches them to jump for the standing skills. We have more standing back tucks in this gym than any other that I have worked in and I think that it is in great part due to doing this warm-up once each month.
 
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BlairBob

Guest
The problem with using plyo in this way is it tends to stagnate after a time and merely be Plyo-light. The intensity never is amped to what it should be for ideal conditions so it's basically metabolic more so tha plyometric.

It's a good warm-up and fun though. I use that version mostly in this sense as a game for the boys.

I tend to vary my S&C per gymnast though when it comes to implementation. It really makes it more difficult but I hate the idea of kid A working on the same thing kid B is when they are more weaker or stronger. This is very often my case with my kids.
 
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