For Parents Remembering

skschlag

Moderator
Staff member
Gold Membership
Proud Parent
Jul 19, 2011
10,378
Region 9
Country
USA
So, this is a tough time. That is an understatement. Especially for those with older gymnasts, juniors/seniors, who have or may have seen the last of their JO career without even knowing it. Add to that, the stress of recruiting, and what that and college gymnastics could look like, it can quickly become overwhelming.

As I was getting sad today, thinking about the "what could have beens" and the "what might happens", I decided to step back and remember what gymnastics has done for my son. Not where it can take him, but all the things he has gained. And no matter what happens, those lessons are there for life.

*time management
*goal setting and achievement
*determination
*grit
*resilience
*teamwork
*coachability
*Focus
*independence
*and the many many friends from all over the country!

he will always have these skills and wonderful memories. I cannot focus on the issues of what the future might or might not hold, but I have to appreciate what this sport has done for him as a young adult, and use that to stay optimistic and hopeful.
 
Did ChalkBucket help you?... help us too.

If you can't help financially... tell a friend about us!

cmg

New Member
Proud Parent
Jul 2, 2018
42
60
Country
USA
So earlier this year before Covid-19 hit I was thinking it might be good for my daughter to take a gap year before she goes to college. She just finished sophomore year and I realized she has two more years to go, but she has no idea what she wants to do for her career. Not that she should at this age, but I also thought she could focus on her gymnastics if her dream is to really walk on a college gymnastics team. She really needs one more year to get her skills down. Now that the pandemic has hit I think having another year to get ready not only for gymnastics but just a year to think about what she is truly passionate about just plan makes sense. She could get a part-time job, perhaps help with coaching and continue to work on her skills. I don't think there is an age limit to compete JO. Several boys at our gym have gone to the local university, (there is no boys gymnastics team) stayed with our gym and had a goal of doing better at nationals. Unfortunately, for the young man who did that this year he did not get his opportunity to compete at nationals. He was a rings specialist and his coach was hoping someone would want to pick him up. But that did not happen and I think now he has just decided to stay at the local university since it is a good school and be done with gymnastics. I think he is considering coaching now which gyms always need good coaches.

Anyway I guess my point is that high school kids always have the option of taking a year off before going to college. You still apply to schools but then you just defer the start date. I think that it gives kids perspective, they can take local courses in subjects they think they may want to major in, try to find an internship in an area they like, or volunteer for a local charity. There really are lots of options in a gap year. Number one being to just plan grow up a bit and become responsible. At least for my daughter I think a gap year would be really good for her but we will see what happens in the next two years. She actually applied for a job last night now that she has her license. I was really proud of her although it is in the restaurant business as a server which is a risky job right now, I was happy she had the initiative to apply and she genuinely seemed excited to have a job and earn her own money. I have no idea if they will hire someone with no experience or not. I know a gap year is not for everyone, but it might be an option to consider if competing for a college team really was on their wish list.
 
  • Like
Reactions: skschlag

skschlag

Moderator
Staff member
Gold Membership
Proud Parent
Jul 19, 2011
10,378
Region 9
Country
USA
Some have that option, so do not. FOr a boy...they have to be 18 or under to be able to compete JO, or in high school. Once they are 19 and graduated, they cannot compete USAG, but have to move to elite competitions. It is very different for the boys ;)

I think that is great that your daughter has that option. My son does not. He will turn 19 after graduating. So either college or elite level. Some JO meets have an elite competition. He is a junior, and still hoping that he might be able to do college gymnastics :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: PinPin and cmg

cmg

New Member
Proud Parent
Jul 2, 2018
42
60
Country
USA
Some have that option, so do not. FOr a boy...they have to be 18 or under to be able to compete JO, or in high school. Once they are 19 and graduated, they cannot compete USAG, but have to move to elite competitions. It is very different for the boys ;)

I think that is great that your daughter has that option. My son does not. He will turn 19 after graduating. So either college or elite level. Some JO meets have an elite competition. He is a junior, and still hoping that he might be able to do college gymnastics :)
I am not sure if my daughter has the option to compete or not. I personally have not found a specific rule limiting older gymnasts but there might be one out there. Maybe someone who is more familiar with the rules knows. I do see rules for the minimum age a girl has to be to compete each level, but so far I have not found one that states that they can only compete through high school or up to age 18. But I am sure if I am wrong someone on here will point it out!!
 

txgymfan

Administrator
Staff member
Gold Membership
Coach
Proud Relative
Fan
Sep 4, 2008
3,081
Houston
Country
USA
There is no upper age limit for JO. There have been a few examples in the past few years of gymnasts competing in their late 30’s. Some have been former elite or college athletes. I’m sure some members can provide examples.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PinPin and cmg

skschlag

Moderator
Staff member
Gold Membership
Proud Parent
Jul 19, 2011
10,378
Region 9
Country
USA
There is no upper age limit for JO. There have been a few examples in the past few years of gymnasts competing in their late 30’s. Some have been former elite or college athletes. I’m sure some members can provide examples.
For JO Girls.....correct. For JO boys, there is.
 
  • Like
Reactions: txgymfan

cmg

New Member
Proud Parent
Jul 2, 2018
42
60
Country
USA
For JO Girls.....correct. For JO boys, there is.
Well that is good news. At least the option is open for her. Like I said its nice to have different options available given this pandemic and uncertainty with next year's competition. Thanks for responding.
 

skschlag

Moderator
Staff member
Gold Membership
Proud Parent
Jul 19, 2011
10,378
Region 9
Country
USA
Well that is good news. At least the option is open for her. Like I said its nice to have different options available given this pandemic and uncertainty with next year's competition. Thanks for responding.
It really is. Options are great, especially during uncertainty.
 
  • Like
Reactions: cmg

KSLaura

Coach
Coach
Proud Parent
Dec 30, 2012
140
Colorado
Country
USA
There is no upper age limit for JO. There have been a few examples in the past few years of gymnasts competing in their late 30’s. Some have been former elite or college athletes. I’m sure some members can provide examples.
We had a coach at our gym that competed L10 several years in a row. She was in her mid/late 20’s with 2 kids. :).
 

cmg

New Member
Proud Parent
Jul 2, 2018
42
60
Country
USA
However, many gyms do not have insurance for training adults, so that may also be an issue.
Luckily for me our gym teaches a very popular adult class. A lot of former gymnasts attend and many adults who have never done gymnastics come to this class. It is actually a really fun class to watch with the range of abilities and an awesome coach who the participants love!!
 
Thank you for supporting our sponsors Energym Music & Norberts!