For Parents Summer Strength and Flexibility class

Strength and Flexibility Summer class, interesting or no?

  • Yes, I'm tired of hearing about that skill my DD/DS is frustrated at not having!

    Votes: 12 100.0%
  • No, they'll get whatever strength or flexibility they need from time spent in class eventually

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • My kid already has the strength of the Hulk and the stretch of Elasti-Girl so there!

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    12
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Linsul

Active Member
Sep 19, 2008
876
Pripyat
This is my first time ever attempting to post a poll, so forgive me if I screw it up!

I have a lot of coordinated kids in rec who want a specific skill, but are held back by flexibility or strength issues. Common examples are back walkovers, pullovers, and backbends.

The structure of a 1 hour class at my gym allows for a warm-up and then 12-15 minutes on 3 events. To keep kids on the events and practicing their skills, we rarely do focused conditioning. They want to be on the equipment, parents want to see that, etc. For the ones who really want a skill that's eluding them due to strength or flexibility, they only have the option of taking privates or being disciplined at home about doing simple conditioning.

I figure with summer around the corner, it would be nifty to offer a strength and flexibility class. Something around 6-ish weeks maybe. It would give those kids a chance to focus on those things without taking time away from their regular gymnastics class. We could do it in a fun structured way that doesn't put the coffee table (or the child!) at risk at home.

There's some details I'd have to work out first, but I figure before I go there I'd ask if parents would even be interested in that. It seems simple to me: kid wants skill badly, can't get 24 hour fitness membership, oh hey look a summer strength class that's cheaper than privates! Not to mention cheaper than a full week of recreational Summer Camp if that's not an option. So vote and help me get a gauge on if I'm crazy or not please!
 
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Aussie_coach

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I think its a great iddea, and not just for summer but for all year around. The biggest thing will be helping kids and parents to understand that they need it. Most parents have no idea of the strength needed for skills, they just assume you teach the kid to do it and the kid does it.
 

MdGymMom01

Active Member
Mar 5, 2008
2,236
North America
I think it is a great idea as well!! My DD is one of those that trained very early with the strength and flexibility at various cheer gyms before switching to gymnastics and although she may not pick up the skills as quickly as some, her strength and flexibility that she has gained has really helped her overall gymnastics. Strength and flexibility training may be somewhat boring and not as fun as learning new tricks and skills, but it is SO needed and important.
 

Linsul

Active Member
Sep 19, 2008
876
Pripyat
I think its a great idea, and not just for summer but for all year around. The biggest thing will be helping kids and parents to understand that they need it. Most parents have no idea of the strength needed for skills, they just assume you teach the kid to do it and the kid does it.
The bolded part made me L-O-L! I have had parents who think it's just comprehension and mimicry before too. If that were the case we'd all be Olympians!

Having to tell parents that their child won't get a skill over strength or flexibility always makes them ask the same question: 'What can we do?' As a parent myself I sure wouldn't want to nag my kid into doing the splits/bridges or turn my home into childs gym lol. Having a class for it solves those things at least!

Like you I would like to have the class year round! It's not currently in place yet, I'm sure if it did well over the Summer it would get adopted as year round. I need to sell the idea to the owner. Maybe even to some parents for that matter lol. I figure 6 weeks is a good testing period right? I've got parents that I know don't want to spend a ton on a rec camp but really want their kids to get some skills. I figure this is a cheaper, longer lasting, focused workout augmentation.

I think it is a great idea as well!! My DD is one of those that trained very early with the strength and flexibility at various cheer gyms before switching to gymnastics and although she may not pick up the skills as quickly as some, her strength and flexibility that she has gained has really helped her overall gymnastics. Strength and flexibility training may be somewhat boring and not as fun as learning new tricks and skills, but it is SO needed and important.
Thanks! I agree it's not the most fun part of gymnastics lol. I wouldn't make it boot camp though I promise! There are lots of games we can sneak strength into, contests, that kind of thing. It wouldn't be like a team conditioning regimen, more tailored to the individual child. There's lots of drills that can be scaled to each kids ability and overall effort :)

Some will come in eye of the tiger and ready to get serious, and the more playful ones will still benefit from the time spent active. The good thing about this is there's minimal spotting, so a coach could keep everyone active and engaged regardless of ability as long as they actually want to be there!
 
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JessMom

Member
Proud Parent
Mar 6, 2009
479
I thinki t's a good idea and you could probably get some cheer, dance, ice skating girls interested. Strength and flexibility are a huge part of most sports and something that is hard to focus on. If you could make it fun I think the gym could do well with it and the kids would benefit
 
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gymgramma

Guest
and for team kids how about adding a "leaps, jumps and spins" class?
 

Linsul

Active Member
Sep 19, 2008
876
Pripyat
and for team kids how about adding a "leaps, jumps and spins" class?
You were probably speaking about how nice this would be in general, but it's in the back of my head too. I swear, practically all my boss did was talk about my dance background at my interview. Then we fought (good naturedly) over getting a ballet barre forever. Between that, a high bar, mirrors, a block, and therabands I could have the girls turning those out quick style. I'm playing super appreciative of what I have coach at the moment. If I move on to too many things all at once he'll want to ring my neck lol!
 

Tim_Dad

Member
Nov 3, 2008
414
Region IV (Missouri)
Linsul,
I'm curious about how you will motivate the gymmies for 6 weeks, and limit the class to conditioning?

Nastia and I workout together... this alone, plue our little 'goals chart' is our only motivation. I'm not sure she would like or be willing to sign up for a class this is just exersize, without a little gym mixed in.

I'm always trying to explain that certain exersizes will help tremendously with something in gym. But she's not making the connections. She only sees conditioning as hard work, and gymnastics as fun.
 

Linsul

Active Member
Sep 19, 2008
876
Pripyat
Linsul,
I'm curious about how you will motivate the gymmies for 6 weeks, and limit the class to conditioning?

Nastia and I workout together... this alone, plue our little 'goals chart' is our only motivation. I'm not sure she would like or be willing to sign up for a class this is just exersize, without a little gym mixed in.

I'm always trying to explain that certain exersizes will help tremendously with something in gym. But she's not making the connections. She only sees conditioning as hard work, and gymnastics as fun.
There are lots of games that utilize upper body and lower body strength. Like I said earlier (boot camp reference), it wouldn't be filing in for crunches and leg lifts! Plus, if I'm not mistaken your daughter is on a team, and this would be for recreational kids. There are some very motivated non-competitive kids out there who are just not *quite* strong or flexible enough to get a skill they greatly desire. I've seen kids who have awesome skills elsewhere struggle with pullovers and stiff shoulder BWO attempts for months, this would be more for them. Could they do our competitive teams conditioning or flexibility? No, and they wouldn't be asked to. However they could come in, get an in depth understanding of what they'll need for skills that are eluding them, be active, and if nothing else have some fun.

Conditioning can be seen as hard work, but in a rec situation it would be more about how hard they want to work and not how hard I think they should be working. If a child understands they're working towards a doable goal though that's about all you can ask. When it comes to making connections between strength and gymnastics, our location at the gym gives us an advantage. Not only can we explain it, we can spot them or use drills to actually show them exactly where what muscles come into play for the skill(s) in question. It's strength and flexibility, but for sure we'd put our mats, toys, and pits to work to make it as fun and as relevant to their goal as possible.

6 weeks, I picked that because that seems about right to me to test this out. I don't want it to be all consuming, just one class a week. If they gain anything from it it should be visible in their gymnastics classes in that time frame I think.

The goals chart is good! If I get to try this out for funsies I may have to steal your idea!
 

Tim_Dad

Member
Nov 3, 2008
414
Region IV (Missouri)
Don't get me wrong. I do like the idea - especially for Rec, and I think it may get a very positive response. But the presentation of the idea (as a parent) is what gave me pause.

To extend on my thoughts from above:
I'm not sure I would sign my DD up for a class that was entitled or presented as conditioning and flexability in fear that DD wouldn't see the course though. I see the benefits, but I'm not sure Nastia would.

Also, Gym isn't exactly cheap, and MORE gym would take a bit of convincing to a paying parent. I know Nastia's initial reaction would be something like "Psst...I don't wanna do that!"

So from a business perspective, I think what's needed is for the girls to convince the parents to allow them to attend. That's entirely different. Remember, Puppy dog eyes, promises of a clean bedroom, and foregoing anything with the words "American Girl" for a year on it can be very effective tools.

Now, if you entitled it something like "Extreme Gymnastics", and briefly explained that it's a conditioning and flexability course that "extends and enhances your gymnastics ability" -- she would be all over it! No question in my mind.

In our gym, rec & tumble is very popular. Especially with the local cheerleaders. Like you say, They just aren't going to become very strong or bendy in a one hour a week class.

Again, I think the idea is a winner, as long as it's presented and focused on Gymnastics. In my eyes, that's key.


Our Goal chart (progress tracking) is absolutely required to motivate ourselves. Not only does Nastia want to meet/beat her goals, it's always important that she beats her old-mans ability too. If I do 15 push ups, she REALLY pushes herself to get 16. She refuses to allow me to be better then her. Which is fine with me..cause I'm getting tired! :D
 
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Linsul

Active Member
Sep 19, 2008
876
Pripyat
Don't get me wrong. I do like the idea - especially for Rec, and I think it may get a very positive response. But the presentation of the idea (as a parent) is what gave me pause.

To extend on my thoughts from above:
I'm not sure I would sign my DD up for a class that was entitled or presented as conditioning and flexability in fear that DD wouldn't see the course though. I see the benefits, but I'm not sure Nastia would.

Also, Gym isn't exactly cheap, and MORE gym would take a bit of convincing to a paying parent. I know Nastia's initial reaction would be something like "Psst...I don't wanna do that!"

So from a business perspective, I think what's needed is for the girls to convince the parents to allow them to attend. That's entirely different. Remember, Puppy dog eyes, promises of a clean bedroom, and foregoing anything with the words "American Girl" for a year on it can be very effective tools.

Now, if you entitled it something like "Extreme Gymnastics", and briefly explained that it's a conditioning and flexability course that "extends and enhances your gymnastics ability" -- she would be all over it! No question in my mind.

In our gym, rec & tumble is very popular. Especially with the local cheerleaders. Like you say, They just aren't going to become very strong or bendy in a one hour a week class.

Again, I think the idea is a winner, as long as it's presented and focused on Gymnastics. In my eyes, that's key.


Our Goal chart (progress tracking) is absolutely required to motivate ourselves. Not only does Nastia want to meet/beat her goals, it's always important that she beats her old-mans ability too. If I do 15 push ups, she REALLY pushes herself to get 16. She refuses to allow me to be better then her. Which is fine with me..cause I'm getting tired! :D
I get what your saying, I just take it for granted that people understand the point is to beef up or stretch out key beginner/intermediate zones lol! Since I'm still fleshing it out I have not picked out my winning sales pitch speech yet, but it will happen. I don't want to toot my own horn (sounds so cheesy), but I have around 10 kids during the week who take 1-3 classes a week of mine who would do more if I scheduled myself for another class their level. This idea was concieved with them in mind more than a huge desire to work more lol! I really think they have plenty of skill repetition time and understanding down; and would benefit more from a class that enhances their efforts in gymnastics.

Like that old adage that I sorta remember: If you have 6 hours to cut down a tree, spend 4 of them sharpening your axe...? Something like along that wording lol. This class would be gymnastics based conditioning and stretching to sharpen their 'axe' for when thy're in class and it's go time for skills. That's the theory anyway! I'm also thinking of adding a tiny bit of dance. Since we have mirrors/barre maybe a little time on coupe turns and arabesques, locking knees for straight legs, square hips, etc. The side benefit in my opinion is even if they don't get everything right away it will enhance their understanding and ideally improve their gymnastics vocabulary.

Okay I'm rambling, I was up at 4 yesterday and 5 today. Ouch! It's pretty cool that your daughter will scrap with you for goals lol. Mine doesn't for gymnastics. She will in dance though! If it's 'pretty' she has to do it better than me, good times.
 

emorymom

Active Member
Proud Parent
Oct 10, 2008
1,155
I think this is a wonderful idea.

Here are two suggestions for filling the class.

(1) Keep it to fairly safe exercises, increase the student to teacher ratio, and charge half price of a rec class for enrolled students.
or
(2) Make it an invite or application only type class and send the kids there who you know are motivated; then you just have to sales pitch it to the parents of the kids you've selected, who will probably do it because their child is being invited to.

I'm not sure this hasn't been covered, as I've not read the whole thread today, but this class would also be good for home school PE, and swim team land training. I think there's increasing awareness in the swim teams that land training is of benefit, and not all teams have good facilities for that.
 
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BlairBob

Guest
Look into the USAG Tyson Fitness Challenge. It's basically a strength and calesthenics course. My last gym was a part of it and I put it out there to run a class for all levels based on this and TOPS Str and conditioning and flexibility besides what I was familiar with and some of the GymnasticBodies material.

A lot of it would look something like this:

GymnasticBodies.com • View topic - Blair's basic beginner newbie routine

However, I would be incorporating TOPS elements into it and perhaps the compulsory trampoline routines and basic trampolining besides some vault drills ( sprinting is an awesome way to make gains in leg strength ).

With such a class, you could have higher than normal gymnast:coach ratios and teach it much like a fitness class. It's merely a matter of equipment and space. Lots of circuits and varying progressions.

I imagine it might also look similar to the CrossFitKids program that I have looked into but in respect to them and because of brand issues, I wouldn't really use any of that material unless I was affiliated. I don't know the cost of the Tyson Fitness challenge but I will tell you it's very simplistic. All the TOPS and Future Stars stuff is available online ( though you will need to message your State coordinator for Future Stars to get access to the routines [ really all you need for these purposes is the strength and flexibility testing ] ).

Charging $5/class may or may not be enough. If I had 10 gymnasts per class, 5-7 could be done. For 5, it would need to be 10$/class which gets pricey since they can probably do 1 more class a week for 1h/d for about $50-60. You could also issue punch cards at a discount instead of the drop-in rate. If I had 15, I could charge 5 and bring in a jr coach. It all depends on what you make per hour or if you are getting a cut similar to a trainer cut.

I would urge you to not let the owner take more than their fair share or you'll end up regretting it in the process unless you really just want to provide this class.

It could also be called GymnasticsFitness or GymFit, etc, maybe. Maybe just Gymnastics S&C or GymP(hysical)T(raining).
 

Tim_Dad

Member
Nov 3, 2008
414
Region IV (Missouri)
One motivational thought that came to mind, don't just coach the skills, but lead by example. Do the same things that is expected from the class yourself.

My wife mentioned that one of the main things that keeps her going at her 3 a week advances arobics classes is the instructor doing the same things as the class. They feel the burn.

If it's motivational for adults, I would imagine it would have wonderful results for kids.

Thoughts?
 

Linsul

Active Member
Sep 19, 2008
876
Pripyat
Look into the USAG Tyson Fitness Challenge. It's basically a strength and calesthenics course. My last gym was a part of it and I put it out there to run a class for all levels based on this and TOPS Str and conditioning and flexibility besides what I was familiar with and some of the GymnasticBodies material.

A lot of it would look something like this:

GymnasticBodies.com • View topic - Blair's basic beginner newbie routine

However, I would be incorporating TOPS elements into it and perhaps the compulsory trampoline routines and basic trampolining besides some vault drills ( sprinting is an awesome way to make gains in leg strength ).

With such a class, you could have higher than normal gymnast:coach ratios and teach it much like a fitness class. It's merely a matter of equipment and space. Lots of circuits and varying progressions.

I imagine it might also look similar to the CrossFitKids program that I have looked into but in respect to them and because of brand issues, I wouldn't really use any of that material unless I was affiliated. I don't know the cost of the Tyson Fitness challenge but I will tell you it's very simplistic. All the TOPS and Future Stars stuff is available online ( though you will need to message your State coordinator for Future Stars to get access to the routines [ really all you need for these purposes is the strength and flexibility testing ] ).

Charging $5/class may or may not be enough. If I had 10 gymnasts per class, 5-7 could be done. For 5, it would need to be 10$/class which gets pricey since they can probably do 1 more class a week for 1h/d for about $50-60. You could also issue punch cards at a discount instead of the drop-in rate. If I had 15, I could charge 5 and bring in a jr coach. It all depends on what you make per hour or if you are getting a cut similar to a trainer cut.

I would urge you to not let the owner take more than their fair share or you'll end up regretting it in the process unless you really just want to provide this class.

It could also be called GymnasticsFitness or GymFit, etc, maybe. Maybe just Gymnastics S&C or GymP(hysical)T(raining).
Thanks, great links! Gymnastics Bodies website is pretty awesome, I clicked around for a bit! Very good ideas in there. As far as charging goes, I would just get paid my hourly I think. It would be something new and different to teach. With rec kids I would have to put more of a game twist on this stuff, which would be the new and different part since I do team conditioning lol. I'm planning on bringing it up today at work and seeing if I'll get the chance to try it out. I asked some of the parents and kids I know well what they think over the course of the week, and they sounded happy to try it. I have 3 that would do it in privates if I don't get the class. For those who don't want to pay the cost of a private, I'd show up for a semi private where 2 or 3 kids came in and their parents split the bill. Privates actually work out to more money for me, but I'd like to have a class so it's accessible and not cost prohibitive. We'll see. I very very rarely do privates since I'm at the gym until 8pm 4 nights a week. Summer is the only exception because I could do them during the day.

In an unexpected turn of events, I got some parents who have kids I do not coach asking me about it. Friends or family of kids I currently coach. I coach a limited amount of rec hours, there's waiting lists for some of the classes. Typical since I coach during peak hours. Some of them actually want to get in my class specifically, and would take this class while waiting for a gymnastics spot to open up. It's been a great week for my ego lol!

One motivational thought that came to mind, don't just coach the skills, but lead by example. Do the same things that is expected from the class yourself.

My wife mentioned that one of the main things that keeps her going at her 3 a week advances arobics classes is the instructor doing the same things as the class. They feel the burn.

If it's motivational for adults, I would imagine it would have wonderful results for kids.

Thoughts?
Shooooot!!!!! I do everything I expect from my classes when it comes to conditioning, and I have 2 of 3 splits, can still tick-tock, crunch, leg lift, you name it! After 2 kids you bet I get in on conditioning as much for mysef as for the gymmies haha! I can go to town with my advanced kids, they'll compete with me to see who can do anything faster/longer. Not always true with the younger or umm less motivated ones though lol. Sometimes I have to be right next to them to get results, and their workout is more important than mine during their class!

I totally understand what you mean though, I talk to a lot of the moms after classes and they ask about adult options. We don't teach adults, but I give them stuff to do at home or at their gym if they're interested. Most of them do their daughters workout with them at home and I hear about how sore they get and whatnot. Then I'm giving them stretching advice lol! I do stretching with some of my friends. One of them is a runner who can barely bend at all, and the other has a bad back and got reprimanded by her chiropractor for having practically no flexibility. They think I'm a freak for being able to touch my toes, but mark my words, they will too one day!
 
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BlairBob

Guest
I've taken to conditioning with the adult class but ideally I'd prefer not to. It's at the end of the day often when I am dehydrated and malnourished. Typically I like to eat something after the adult class, wait a bit and do my S&C before going home, specifically what I have programmed for myself ( which takes a lot more time and skill than the adult class would have time for ).

If I do it, I get a meager workout in and waste my programming time. Bah. Sometimes, I do S&C with my boys, but one of the difficult aspects of this is to still be aware of what they are doing because of focusing on my own conditioning. This has been talked about in the CrossFit trainer circles a lot.

It's one thing to show them it, but if I were to do the same with them, more than likely I may ignore them. Kids do enjoy it when I do it with them, especially if I having a hard time or fail ( they love playing torture the teacher- a sort of conditioning game of them vs me ).
 

Tim_Dad

Member
Nov 3, 2008
414
Region IV (Missouri)
Hmmm... Now i'm REALLY curious what I'm missing.

Blairbob,
When I try your link from work - I get blocked (from my end) with the message:

URL Blocked - Restricted Access
This web page falls into the category of "Sex and Violence". This action has been logged. Continued attempts to open or view restricted internet sources is a violation of the acceptable use policy.



:eek: What exactly are you teaching your boys???? :rolleyes:
 
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BlairBob

Guest
Weird. I'm not sure what's causing it to be flagged as such. Maybe they somehow heard of how they sometimes try to wrestle me down and think I'm think I'm a child abuser ( throwing kids into pit, making sure I'm still the alpha, teaching young boys cool little tricks ).

In anycase, try viewing it at home or:

btw, some of this is similar to the Tyson Fitness challenge and I found out if your gym is a Member of USAG, they can the kit for free if they request it. Go look on USAG, I just got the email.

I've responded in posts what I have thought the basic movements beginners should undertake. In fact, what I'm going to post is exactly what the basics I will be having( inflicting ) upon my beginner-ish boys upon the off-season.

By all means, you should read this first and buy the BtGB first if you're gonna follow it. What I propose is very broad and I'm not going to go through each progression of each movement system.

GymnasticBodies.com • View topic - Something to read before designing your own routine

It is also based a lot on this http://www.usa-gymnastics.org/home/publications/technique/2006/8/pdf/GetFit.pdf with some tweaks.

Static movements. Isometrics.
_____________________________
~Handstand. As in wall handstand.

~Headstand, should be done before HS. No biggie.

~Hang L. Eventually this will be Hang V. Basically follow the old Sommer Leg lift article. Start if necessary in tuck.

~Body Lever. Focus on just holding this completely inverted with a straight, hollow body. Really basic version is holding the hollow position on ground ( I start this by starting in a tuck and picking the head off the floor with the fingers pointing to the ceiling [ basically a crunch ] and then extending to a tuck position with hips and knees at 90 degree angles till it's in straight body )

~Superman position on a pommel horse or balance beam. This is the top of the reverse leg lift or hyper back extension. A super basic version would be holding the arch hold on ground.

~Tuck front lever, Tuck back lever. Doing skin the cats is one of the most basic things and it moves through these positions. This is merely stopping at those angles or doing negatives from an inverted tuck position.

~Bottom of single leg squat. This is merely learning how to get into the bottom of the single leg squat/pistol and holding the bottom and building the basic flexibility for it before we practice on lowering down or pushing out of it. If neccessary this is done with an assist by holding a post or spotter.

~Heel raise. This is a releve hold. Feet together, stand on the ball of your foot with straight legs. Modified holds are heels out (like a pidgeon), toes out (like a duck) and on one foot (like coupe in dance).

~Flex arm hang. This can be tough for beginners. I prefer they start with feet up on a block so they are in an L position and hold their head above the bar. Many are too weak to jump and hold this position or work negatives in the beginning or just untrained. I don't really care about over or undergrip. I tell kids to grab the rope in a hug by their chin and hold it for 5 with their legs around the rope. Hug the rope and hang on.

~Glute Ham. Secure the feet, squeeze the butt and abs and lower and hold.

~Planche position on single rail or floor. Basically they will assume a pushup position. Round out the shoulders (mad cat). Lean the shoulders over the hands and hold. This can also be done with feet propped up on a box or swiss ball. This is the predecessor to the frog stand but can be done in tandem.

~Basic support technique. Easiest is on a single rail or pommel horse, moving to parallel bars and rings. Super basic is pushup position or yoga reverse dog for training the kinders and unders with. L sit comes from this and starts out by tucking knees up.

~Straddle L

~Gymnastics demi plie position. It's our stick position. Butt back, arms straight out at horizontal. Knees together. Think of it sorta like a wall sit.

~Hand bridge.

Isokinetics, "dynamic" movement
_______________________________

~pullups

~pushups from incline to decline, from headstand to handstand piked on box as in the article to eventually using parallettes, pseudo planche pushups

~hanging leg lifts

~body lever lifts. first lower down, then from ground to invert

~reverse leg lifts

~skin the cats and variants

~glute ham raises

~pistols/single leg squats

~height jumps/drops

~lunges, these are sort of in our warmup/mobility though.

~heel raises/toe raises (stand on heel, raise toes)

~walking in support, shrugging, dipping, swinging

~seated straddle and pike leg lifts and holds, v-up and straddle ups from ground, doing them from hang as well

~rocking back and forth in bridge, on one hand or one foot, going from a head bridge to hand bridge, bridge kickovers, backbends, back walkovers/limbers and forwards.

~handstand head/shoulder/side tappers, shrugs doing them free, kicking to HS against wall/spotter, presses

Voila.
 
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BlairBob

Guest
Right now for my boys, we have a chart with a bunch of physical tests we will be testing every 8 weeks.

I have another I need to create that will be different strength and flexibility progressions based on a star system.

For instance,

ring support with arms outside the rings ( this puts the ring on the inside of the forearm which decreases the weight borne and makes the rings far more stable ) is the 1st star if they can do it for 5s

regular ring support for 5s will be 2 stars

ring support for 15s will be 3

ring support for 30s will be 4

ring support for 60s will be 5.

i'll be breaking it down and besides the 2 team boys, I let the pre-team/advance rec boys have their names on their chart and we test for fun or they can challenge it whenever they like ( if we have time ). there is stuff like flexibility angles or how many skin the cats ( from a hang, stand, etc ), lever holds and progression, successful HS out of 10 attempts, walking, a whole bunch of stuff.

DrillsAndSkills.com :: View topic - Proposed Strength and Flexibility testing I'm going to do

I really need to finish this before Friday and make the chart out ( takes forever to line it ).

Maybe eventually I should do something similar for the rec kids as well ( hesistant because there are more of them and i'd burn through space faster ). There isn't any skill chart system given out due to costs right now. We/I have a progression skill system for the rec levels 1-3 ( actually I think it goes to L4 ) but L1 and L2 are the rec and L3 is for preteam. Some of the preteamers are still on L2 but typically they behave better or show more potential and are thus invited to the team/advanced rec-preteam workout.
 
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