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Rythmic lesson plan, any ideas?

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KipGirl91

Member
Oct 28, 2008
86
Canada
This is my first session teaching rythmic, I've been teaching pre-schoolers and 6-11 years olds before, in artistic! I have one class that's awesome, one class that has a very small attention span:rolleyes:. Like I said, I've NEVER taught rythmic before, and I'm an artistic gymnast myself. If not for Youtube, I wouldn't have a single clue of what rythmic is about. Any ideas on how to keep the class moving and fun for 3-5 year olds?
 

all-aroundgirl

Active Member
Aug 26, 2008
646
Texas
I would say, since there attention span is so small, to keep them moving from skill to skill to skill. Not so much that they would hurt themselves, but enough that they can't get bored.

I had never heard of rthymtic gymnastics before Beijing, so we both don't really know what it is about. I'm sure there is somewhere here that knows more than I do but I hope that was helpful! Good luck! :)
 
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MdGymMom01

Active Member
Mar 5, 2008
2,236
North America
Rythmic is with the hoops, ribbons and balls right?? I would start introducing the ball and ribbon and just let them play around with them. Have them play a game of catch with the ball and roll it to each other (helps develop hand eye coordination) and let them learn how to hold the ribbon. Age 3-5 is tough to teach ANY sport so the import thing is let them have fun!!! Hope this helps!!
 
N

newbiecoach

Guest
I coach artistic too but here are some ideas off the top of my head.

Set up stations so they are all busy at the same time

Use the equipment for some like the ribbons the balls, clubs whatever you have at the gym

Make another station or two flexibility since that is so important in rythmic dont go overboard though since they are so little, working on splits and touching their toes, we dont teach back bends to kids under 5 so I would ask your gym about that.

Do some basic gymnastics stations too, like cartwheels and forward rolls.

I would keep it similar to the floor workout you do with a regualr preschool class but add in some elements of rythmic.
 

Linsul

Active Member
Sep 19, 2008
876
Pripyat
oooh I bet rythmic is so fun for 3-5 year olds!!! All the stuff to play with! I went to a usag preschool cert class awhile back, this will be a test of how much I retained since I don't actually coach it. There was a lot of emphasis in that class on teaching them how to track objects and of course how to catch. I'm just going to write in a format of rotations.

Rotation 1: Grab a bean bag and a target. Place the target at the gymnasts feet, and give them the beanbag. Have them hold it as high as they can, and ask them to drop it on the 'bullseye.' Tell them they have to watch the beanbag from their hand and as it falls all the way down to the target. This was something mentioned at the class to help them focus on an object so that later they can catch it.

Rotation 2: Using a scarf (since it falls slowly) and a target. Have them do what they did with the beanbag, but this time ask them to watch it and catch it before it hits the target. If that is easy for a gymnast, have them see how many times the can clap before catching the scarf before it hits the target.

Rotation 3: Using a ball, have them roll it to a designated spot. This will help them understand how much force they need to use to get it to a specific destination. You can make the spot close or far, or use multiple ones. Maybe even set up a cone for them to knock over like bowling?

Rotation 4: Have them use a rhythmic ribbon to 'draw' shapes. Circles being the easiest, give them harder shapes if circles are easy. They'll see that the larger their arm movement is, the more the ribbon moves.

Rotation 5: Give one gymnast a jumprope, and have them shake it on the ground. Like a snake slithering. Have another gymnast try to jump on the 'snakes' tail. Thats another one from the class thats a fun way for them to work on their coordination. Give them a space big enough to run around in a bit. I saw a coach do that with a preschool group at my gym, I totally stopped what I was doing to watch them, the kids were so cute and giggly trying to get that bad snakes tail! Providing the rope is ong enough, a gymnast can do that alone too, it's impossible to predict where the rope will go more often than not lol!

Rotation 6: Using a wedge and with a spot at first, they can try foward rolls with the ball if it's small enough for them to hold 1 handed. I did this once with a group of young kids at a summer camp. They hold the ball on their shoulder with the hand on the same side. The other hand they use as they normally would for a forward roll. They get it really quickly! If the ball is too big for their hand, they can hold it between their forarm and bicep with a bent arm and just keep their palm on the surface of the ball.

Something fun all together for coordination: If you have enough scarves for each child, have them make a circle and walk slowly in the same direction. Make up a silly song or simply count to 3, and after you sing a certain line or get to 3, have them throw the scarf over their heads behind them. The person behind has to try to catch the scarf.

Thats all I got for now!
 

gymdog

Well-Known Member
Coach
Former Gymnast
Proud Relative
Jul 5, 2007
5,121
Rotation 6: Using a wedge and with a spot at first, they can try foward rolls with the ball if it's small enough for them to hold 1 handed. I did this once with a group of young kids at a summer camp. They hold the ball on their shoulder with the hand on the same side. The other hand they use as they normally would for a forward roll. They get it really quickly! If the ball is too big for their hand, they can hold it between their forarm and bicep with a bent arm and just keep their palm on the surface of the ball.

Great ideas. They can also roll with the ball kind of wedged in their hip. If they're really good (the older ones) they could try the roll and you gently toss the ball for them to try to catch at the end. My sisters used to compete rhythmic, so I did a few classes and have seen the compulsory routines, and I'm trying to remember the beginning skills, but I think that's how they had them do a pike roll with the ball. Another good thing you can do is "seal" rolls, start on hands and knees with the ball in front of the knees, and then they roll/rock forward over it to a seal position with the ball under their stomach.

Holding the hoop in front of them(both hands on top, it should be "flat" against them) have them jump feet in and out, swinging the hoop as they jump through. They can eventually progress to using the hoop similar to a jump rope - forwards and backwards, one foot and two. Hold hoop up. Transfer from hand to hand. Circle swing the hoop around the arm. Around the hand (should hold the hand like an L with the hoop resting inside the "corner").

Skipping, hopping, walking on toes, over/under, up/down, side. Kicks. Waltz step. Pretty arms. Bouncing the ball (similar to dribbling) as they walk. Bouncing the ball as they go in a circle (one of the compulsory routine used to have a small run on toes in a small circle while bouncing the ball if I recall correctly). Skip, bounce, skip, bounce - any pattern like that.

One thing they can do in pairs similar to the bean bag idea (but more advanced) and with hoop, is one kid can roll the hoop (standing up) and the other can stand facing the hoop and try to either knock it over (easier) or try to toss it through (hard). First I would see if they could roll it back and forth.

Regular cartwheel progressions. If they have a decent cartwheel, lay a hoop or rope down and have them do it with their hands inside. Also work cartwheel to knee. Can eventually progress to lifting hoop/rope up as they complete cartwheel.

Some of these will be too hard for some of the kids, but some of the best 5 year olds may be able to attempt them, so I included more "school age" stuff. I wouldn't work on walkovers at this point, but handstands and handstands with the legs split should be okay.
 

Linsul

Active Member
Sep 19, 2008
876
Pripyat
Great ideas Gymdog! My ideas are more static while yours are more aerobic, I think mixing them up would be a great way to go. Gives plenty to do that's for sure! The mixing of ideas makes me think of Voltron, and maybe it's late, but a coaching Voltron would amazing lol.

FORM OF: RHYTHMIC COACH!

(yes I did laugh at my own joke! I love drinking coffee too late at night!)
 
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