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(stupid) rules regarding spotting/competition

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Geoffrey Taucer

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In women's meets at the JO level, there is a deduction if the coach is standing too close during beam and bars routines, even if they do not touch or talk to the gymnast. Why is this? It seems like it adds unnecessary risk and psychological stress to the two events which are probably already the hardest/scariest for most girls.

Compare that to boys' JO meets, where the coach is required to be right there for the whole routine on highbar and rings. This to me makes much more sense for JO-level athletes.

Any thoughts?
 
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hammy

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I never knew that. I thought there was only a deduction if the coach touched the gymnast. You'd think that the officials would want a coach to be there in case the gymnast falls in a way that could cause severe injury.
 

Geoffrey Taucer

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The coach is allowed to approach for an individual skill, but if he/she is standing there for the whole routine, there's a deduction.
 

lannamavity

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Sep 13, 2007
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In women's meets at the JO level, there is a deduction if the coach is standing too close during beam and bars routines, even if they do not touch or talk to the gymnast. Why is this? It seems like it adds unnecessary risk and psychological stress to the two events which are probably already the hardest/scariest for most girls.

Compare that to boys' JO meets, where the coach is required to be right there for the whole routine on highbar and rings. This to me makes much more sense for JO-level athletes.

Any thoughts?

If an athlete needs spotting the whole routine, she should probably go back to the gym and do some more training before competing.

We don't spot our kids at meets...level 4 or level 10. Period.

We feel that unnecessary risk and psychological stress comes when the kids aren't confident and prepared enough to do a routine without being spotted.

There are times when routines become more a "spotting show" than an athlete's routine. A good coach uses other techniques besides spotting to help an athlete safely learn skills.
 
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Geoffrey Taucer

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I agree that if they need to be spotted throughout the routine, they aren't ready for that routine. However, I don't see any problem with a coach simply standing there, ready to catch them if something goes wrong. As I mentioned before, at boys' meets the coach is required to stand right there ready to catch the gymnast on highbar and rings.
 
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