Welcome to our Gymnastics Community
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.
Sign up

Xcel to ncaa

4theloveofsports

Well-Known Member
Proud Parent
Mar 16, 2011
3,268
Country
USA
D3 schools typically fAlso know an athlete got an academic ride to Harvard for D3 athletics.
Gravely misinformed. No such thing as academic ride to Harvard or any Ivy. And no such thing as a D3 sport in Harvard.

The college/university can be Div1 in one sport but not in others. It’s not all or nothing.do
True. But not the case with Harvard. They are all Division .

Well the kid got money. They found money
If the found money, it was without a doubt need based.
 

Dahlia

Member
Proud Parent
Sep 27, 2013
206
Country
USA
Gravely misinformed. No such thing as academic ride to Harvard or any Ivy. And no such thing as a D3 sport in Harvard.



True. But not the case with Harvard. They are all Division .



If the found money, it was without a doubt need based.
I went to a "need based" only university. Athletes there whose parents made significantly more than mine had bigger financial aid awards with larger grants. There are ways to give athletes money to get them at your school and on your team.
 
Reactions: Jard.the.gymnast

QueenBee

Active Member
Proud Parent
Feb 23, 2015
515
Country
USA
I went to a "need based" only university. Athletes there whose parents made significantly more than mine had bigger financial aid awards with larger grants. There are ways to give athletes money to get them at your school and on your team.
I find there are a lot of people who misunderstand or misrepresent their parents/family's financial picture. I would always be hesitant to believe second (or third hand) account that schools (like the Ivy Leagues) that are need-based ONLY and firmly represent they give NO athletic or merit money are actually giving better financial packages to athletes with the same (or better) financials than non-athlete families.

There are lots of ways families "live larger than their incomes". Unless you've seen the family's FAFSA and CSS forms (and you have access to the schools financial aid process), you are really just speculating on whether they were given anything more than what they would have been entitled to otherwise.

I think there are also a ton of families who don't seem to understand that "scholarship" on their financial aid form doesn't in any way necessarily mean the money given is for athletics or merit. It often just represents straight grant monies (meaning it doesn't need to be repaid).
 
Reactions: MILgymFAM

Natasha

Active Member
Proud Parent
Jan 28, 2011
1,680
Country
USA
I find there are a lot of people who misunderstand or misrepresent their parents/family's financial picture. I would always be hesitant to believe second (or third hand) account that schools (like the Ivy Leagues) that are need-based ONLY and firmly represent they give NO athletic or merit money are actually giving better financial packages to athletes with the same (or better) financials than non-athlete families.

There are lots of ways families "live larger than their incomes". Unless you've seen the family's FAFSA and CSS forms (and you have access to the schools financial aid process), you are really just speculating on whether they were given anything more than what they would have been entitled to otherwise.

I think there are also a ton of families who don't seem to understand that "scholarship" on their financial aid form doesn't in any way necessarily mean the money given is for athletics or merit. It often just represents straight grant monies (meaning it doesn't need to be repaid).
Agreed. And when schools and FAFSa determine need there are factors in addition to income- # of kids in college for a particular year for example.
 

suebee

Member
Proud Parent
Dec 6, 2012
368
To add to that, schools like Harvard and Yale have a lot of resources and they are incredibly generous financially to students who are admitted. Their need-based financial aid packages are often much stronger than what other colleges can offer the same student, and this too may falsely give the impression that they are giving “merit” or “athletic” aid because a student may get a much bigger financial aid package from Harvard or Yale than from any other school they are admitted to.
 

bookworm

Active Member
Proud Parent
Oct 3, 2009
2,990
On my couch either reading or doing nothing...
Country
USA
Agreed. And when schools and FAFSa determine need there are factors in addition to income- # of kids in college for a particular year for example.
Don't count on "# of kids in college" to help with your FAFSA...we had 3 in college for multiple years and got less each year to the point of zero. The colleges basically said, "figure it out" . You have to have an income of below 60K to qualify.
 
Reactions: Exgymmomx3

raenndrops

Well-Known Member
Coach
Proud Relative
Former Gymnast
Oct 24, 2009
6,201
The 'Wood, Ohio
Country
USA
So I am in IL -- but do not have HS gymnastics where I live (so no personal experience). However, a good friend of mine is at a club with several HS gymnasts. Not sure of their levels, but she said they will all compete a meet before winter sports season officially starts, hopefully qualify for state, and then return in time to finish out the season (state, regionals, etc.). Also, my very quick google research found the video below from 2018 (looks like fun, no?) and a quick search on mymeetscores revealed that the girls named at the end of the video definitely competed JO in 2018 (Levels 9 or 10), but very few meets.

I also have experience with respect to another high school sport. You most definitely can NOT compete club and high school at the same time (IHSA has three season - fall, winter, spring), but can compete club outside of your season. My son plays year-round travel baseball, but has no practice/games during the spring HS baseball season. Because IL has meets from October to March, I imagine it is possible to squeeze in a meet before or after the official winter sports season.

I have no idea about fair or not fair. I mean, I actually love the idea of competitive high school gymnastics for girls at Levels 8+ One of my biggest concerns about gymnastics is its negative impact socially given the high hours (and it seems like this might be a reason some girls quit as they near high school age). How awesome for girls to have a few months to connect with school peers on a team.

I guess it is fair to say that HS gymnastics really depends on area (state-by-state, and even within the state itself), and by club.
I know that in Ohio, the HS season runs approximately mid-December to early March.
There is also a date in January that gymnasts can compete for their club up until (as long as they have not competed for their HS yet), but once they compete for the High School team, they have to stop club meets until their last HS meet (state, if they qualify).
Our meet season begins in November. We will have some girls compete for us (Xcel Platinum, L7, and L8) in the 2 November meets and at least 1 of the December meets. Since the 2nd December meet is a home meet, a couple of them are hoping that the first HS meet is either AFTER that OR the first HS meet is snowed out, lol. They won't come back to team until our Championship meet in mid-March.
Several of the teams we compete against also have girls that compete for their high school teams.
 

4theloveofsports

Well-Known Member
Proud Parent
Mar 16, 2011
3,268
Country
USA
I went to a "need based" only university. Athletes there whose parents made significantly more than mine had bigger financial aid awards with larger grants. There are ways to give athletes money to get them at your school and on your team.
You might have misunderstood my post. My post was very specific to Harvard and the Ivies. And I was correcting the misinformation provided which was and is still wholly incorrect. Harvard does not have a Division 3 sport team and they only give need based money. I don't believe I implied in any way that coaches in general cannot get athletes money to get them on their team. I don't know what need based university you went to but you did not state it was an ivy. So your university must have a different policy in providing need based aid.

In any event, Harvard does have a large endowment, and many families get more money then they think they can get. Nonetheless, the money any student at the Ivies will get still follows a formula based on need. That said, you can still make over $250K and get some money. You'll definitely get less than someone making $150k. Additionally, income is only one factor used to determine need. There are several other factors, assets, another college student, etc. So the parents who you state may have received more "aid" and made more money, may have had less assets, money in the bank, real estate than you. Unless you know exactly what those parents put in their application, it is hard to draw conclusions.